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November 4, 2013

Here is a simplified but extensive list of the pros and cons of the dog seat belts we currently have available at PetAutoSafety.com:

Maya ClickIt Utility Dog Seat Belt

I was pleasantly surprised at how well the ClickIt Utility dog seat belt kepy my crazy dog Maya in her seat.

CLICKIT UTILITY CANINE CAR HARNESS

Pro and Con – This harness is very restrictive on your dog. This is a pro because the Center for Pet Safety has concluded that the more restricted your dog is, the safer he is likely to be in a car accident. This is a con because some dogs hate to be restricted. While the ClickIt Utility allows your dog to sit and lie down, it does not allow him to stand. And he cannot move around very easily.

Pros
*
The top rated brand in regards to safety
*
Three point attachment system for ultimate safety
*
Padded vest
*
Vest lies low on the chest to prevent choking
*
Can easily be used for walking as well as riding
*
Keeps your dog on the seat
*
Prevents side-to-side movements, which can be beneficial in an auto accident
*
Comes in three different colors

Cons
*
It can’t be used for very small dogs. The extra small is actually for larger small dogs.
*
It can only be used in the back seat and only if your vehicle is a 2001 model and later. These newer vehicles have latchbars located between the seat cushions and they are necessary in order to secure your dog with the ClickIt Utility harness.
* Your dog will not be able to stand up or move around while wearing this canine car harness
* Can be difficult putting it on and adjusting it for the first time
* Some reported that when dogs try to move around, they get tangled in the securing straps.

*
Expensive

Ruff Rider Roadie Dog Seat Belt

The Ruff Rider Roadie, in business since 1996, is the next best safety brand after the ClickIt.

RUFF RIDER ROADIE

Pros
* The Ruff Rider Roadie is n
ot as restrictive as the ClickIt Utility so your dog can move around a little more
*
Safety rating is better than most other brands tested (except ClickIt)
*
Converts easily into a walking harness
*
Pleated under the front legs in order to prevent chaffing
*
Available for almost every size of dog
* Your dog may be able to sit, stand, or lie down while wearing the Ruff Rider Roadie
*
Can be used with a car seat belt or in the cargo area if cargo rings are present
*
Pressure in a car accident goes on the dog’s chest, not is throat, so no choking
* Made in the USA

Cons
*
No padded vest
*
Tether adjustment is minimal
*
A dog that tries to moves around a lot could get tangled. Using the longer adjustment or using the carabiner to secure your dog instead could help prevent this. But a longer tether decreases safety.
*
Because it doesn’t restrict your dog as much as the ClickIt, there is risk that your dog will launch off the seat or side to side in a car accident.
*
Tether is non-detachable. It can be used as a leash for walking but is not very long.
*
Comes only in one color
*
Pricy (not as expensive than the ClickIt but more expensive than many other brands)

Pierson Wearing Bergan Dog Seat Belt

Pierson looks very handsome in his padded Bergan dog seat belt harness. And he doesn’t get tangled in the adjustable tether.

BERGAN DOG SEAT BELT HARNESS

Pros
* The Bergan canine car harness has a v
ery well padded vest
*
Fits all but very small dogs
*
Depending on if your vehicle has cargo rings, it may be used in the cargo area of an SUV
*
Neck and chest strap is fully adjustable
*
Less risk of tangling with this tether
* Tether is adjustable in length
*
Affordable pricing

Cons
* The Bergan c
an’t easily be used as a walking harness
* The small may be too big for smaller small dogs
* Failed crash testing at extra-large size
*
Padding comes a little higher up the chest. Unknown risk of choking.
*
Because it doesn’t restrict your dog as much as the ClickIt, there is risk that your dog will launch off the seat or side to side in a car accident.
* Can be a challenge when putting it on and adjusting it for the first time
*
Comes only in one color (mossy oak was another color but has been discontinued and only available while supplies last)

Maya Go-Tech Pet Seat Belts

The raspberry Kurgo Go-Tech is the perfect color for my girl Maya. I love the padded chest and how it lies lower and looser around the neck.

KURGO DOG SEAT BELTS

Pros
* Kurgo dog seat belts have a p
added vest
*
Can easily be used as a walking harness
*
Walking leash can be attached at the back or the front of the chest to limit pulling
* Kurgo
Go-Tech style has a low and loose neck to prevent choking
*
Lots of cool colors available
*
Affordable pricing

Cons
*
Tru-Fit style failed at 25lb and 75lb crash testing (passed at 45lbs)
*
It can only be used with the seat belt of the car. It can’t be used in the cargo area.
*
Dogs that like to move around can get tangled in the tether mechanism. The direct connect tether can be purchased separately and can help prevent tangling. However, a longer tether means a decrease in safety.
*
Go-Tech style neck is not adjustable
*
Because it doesn’t restrict your dog as much as the ClickIt, there is risk that your dog will launch off the seat or side to side in a car accident.

Guardian Gear Plaid Dog Seat Belts

These plaid dog seat belts from Guardian Gear are adorable, but consider them as a prevention against driver distraction rather than for safety.

GUARDIAN GEAR / CRUISING COMPANION (STANDARD)

Pros
*
Very inexpensive
*
Lots of cool colors and styles
*
Some are padded
*
No tangling or twisting with the tethers
*
Can be used as a walking harness

Cons
*
Not designed to hold up in a car accident. May help to keep dogs from being a distraction to the driver and may help for sudden stops, but there are no other safety features.
*
Some may come up high on the neck, risking choking
*
Our site has limited colors and sizes available because we are no longer keeping this dog seat belt harness brand in stock.

We hope this list is helpful. If you have any other questions or concerns about our dog seat belt harness brands, please feel free to email us at naturebydawn@aol.com.

Dawn with Maya & Pierson

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2013 Comparison of Dog Car Seat Belts

Author: MayaAndPierson
October 14, 2013
Compare Five Dog Seat Belt Brands

Dog seat belt brands listed left to right, top to bottom: ClickIt Utility, Ruff Rider Roadie, Bergan, Kurgo Tru-Fit, Kurgo Go-Tech.

The study that evaluated the safety of canine car harnesses completed by the Center for Pet Safety has made it much easier for us to determine which brand really is the best. But the best may not always be the right one for you and your dog. So here are some other comparisons for you to consider when looking for the perfect way for your best friend to ride in the car. Please note, our comparison only covers dog car seat belts we currently have available at Pet Auto Safety.

QUALITY
Quality goes nearly hand-in-hand with safety. While most brands appear to be well made, only a couple of them held up in all three crash test weights conducted by the Center for Pet Safety (CPS). So when considering quality, consider safety.

SAFETY
The following is a list of the dog car seat belts rating from the safest to the least effective as according to CPS:
ClickIt Utility
– Ruff Rider Roadie
– Bergan
– Kurgo Tru-Fit
– Kurgo Go-Tech
– Pet Buckle
– Guardian Gear (our standard brand)
The Kurgo Go-Tech was not part of the study conducted by CPS (see their full report from CPS here). However, it is very much like the Tru-Fit in style and make. Pet Buckle failed the safety tests conducted by CPS. Guardian Gear was not tested by CPS but we know for a fact that these canine car harnesses have not been tested for safety by the manufacturer. They are primarily used to help prevent driver distractions and to help keep a dog from getting thrown around in a sudden stop or swerve.

PRICE
As would be expected, the price generally reflects the quality and safety. The following brands are listed from most expensive to least expensive:
– ClickIt Utility – $90 – $100
– Ruff Rider Roadie – $43 – $55
– Pet Buckle – $28 – $55
– Bergan – $24 – $35
– Kurgo Go-Tech – $22 – $32
– Kurgo – Tru-Fit – $20 – $30
– Guardian Gear – $13 – $20

EASE OF USE
All these pet safety belt brands seem difficult to put on your dog when putting them on for the first time. Even the second and third attempt can be difficult. But once you get used to it, all of them are easy. I do think, however, with the ClickIt Utility’s three attachment points that securing your dog in the car with this brand takes slightly more effort than the others do. But it is not difficult once you get a hang of it.

HOW THEY WORK
There are three different ways to secure your dog in the car with a pet safety belt:
1.
Use the safety belt of your car and run it through a loop on the harness. This method is used by the Ruff Rider Roadie, Kurgo, Pet Buckle, and is one of the three attachment points used by the ClickIt Utility. The ClickIt, however, doesn’t actually run through a loop. It runs through the harness straps itself.

Kurgo Tru-Fit Tether Loop

The seat belt of your car goes through a loop on the tether of certain dog seat belt brands.

Back of the ClickIt Dog Seat Belt

The seat belt of your car goes through the back of the ClickIt as one of three attachment points of the harness.

2. Connect the harness tether to the latchbar located between the seat cushions of 2001 to newer vehicle models. This method can be used by the Ruff Rider Roadie with their included caribiner clip, Bergan with the caribiner clip on its tether, Pet Buckle if the Kwik-Connect tether is used, and it is the other two attachment points used by the ClickIt.

Kwik-Connect Tether for Pet Buckle

The Kwik-Connect tether clips onto the latchbar located between the cushions rear car seats (2001 and newer models).

Tether of the ClickIt Utility Dog Safety Belt

These two tethers attach to the latchbars located between the rear seat cushions, and in turn attach to the sides of the ClickIt Utility dog safety belt.

3. Connect directly to the seat belt. The Bergan brand does this by clipping the carabiner in between the webbing of the seat belt receptacle. The Kurgo brand has a direct to seat belt connector that is sold separately and buckles directly into the seat belt receptacle. The Guardian Gear brand buckles directly into the seat belt receptacle as well.

3 Bergan Tether Attachment

The caribiner clip of the Bergan tether can clip between the webbing of the seat belt receptacle.

Buckle Strap for Dog Car Harness

The Kurgo direct to seat belt tether buckles directly into the seat belt receptacle.

The ClickIt must use the first two connection methods. The other brands that have more than one possible connection method must use one method or the other.

FITTING
– ClickIt – Adjusts at both the neck and the chest. The vest piece for the extra small and small may be too bulky for smaller dogs with narrow chests or short bodies. It measures 9 inches long and the narrowest part of the vest is 3.5 inches wide. Despite the sizing indications, the extra small and small is not intended for very small dogs.
– Ruff Rider Roadie – Adjusts at the neck and the chest for medium through extra-large sizes. The neck on the small sizes is not adjustable.
– Bergan – Adjusts at both the neck and the chest. The vest piece for the small may be too bulky for smaller dogs. The harness does not fit very small dogs. The extra-large harness is the largest of all our extra-large harness brands.
– Kurgo Tru-Fit – Adjusts at the neck and the chest.
– Kurgo Go-Tech – Adjusts at the chest only. The harness will be loose at the neck for dogs with a really narrow neck.
– Pet Buckle – Adjusts at the chest and neck. The large size can be adjusted to fit medium-sized dogs but is generally too heavy because of the buckles. Therefore, this brand is only suitable for larger small breeds, or larger medium to large breeds.
Guardian Gear – All styles are adjustable at the chest. Some styles may or may not be adjustable at the neck.

Dog car seat belts we did not consider in our comparison but rated well in safety according to CPS include the Allsafe and RC Pet. Allsafe did as well as the Ruff Rider Roadie and RC Pet rated as well as the Bergan. We did not include these brands in our comparison because we have no experience with them.

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Follow Up Friday #5

Author: MayaAndPierson
August 2, 2013

Follow up from Pet Safety Saturday’s post on Why My Dog Wears a Pet Car Harness:

I was in a rear end collision last Thursday. My dog Maya was with me. I was really sore the following Friday and Saturday but felt much better on Sunday and was 100% better by Monday. Maya seemed not to have been affected at all. She and Pierson were playing as normal on Friday and she has been just as rambunctious on her walks. The auto repair shop told me it is not just the rear bumper that was damaged on my car, but the frame as well. They also told me the cost to repair my car is likely more than my car is worth. So instead of getting my car repaired, I will most likely only receive a 2k check from the other insurance company. My car is a 1998 Ford Contour and doubtedly not worth more than 2k. Makes me wish I had a Toyota instead. 🙁

Follow up on questions received on the blog this week:

Jodi from Heart Like a Dog asks, “How frequently should you stop when driving with dogs?  You should you keep to your regular feeding schedule?  Typically our thought is we stop to let them eat and then when we stop for gas or to use the rest areas, they get a quick walk too.”

That’s a great question, Jodi. When we took a long road trip to Texas with Maya & Pierson we stopped every couple of hours or so. This coincided with the stops we made to get gas, at rest stops for our own potty breaks, and stops we made for food. I would start out with this as your plan. But watch their behavior. If they are generally quiet on the ride but suddenly get restless, it may mean that they need a break. Also, more active dogs may need more frequent stops.

For feeding, it really depends on how your dogs handle car rides. Do you know if they tend to get car sick? Pierson tends to get car sick so I gave him several small meals instead of his normal two big meals.

Hawk, Brown Dog CBR says, “Buying a seat belt really perplexed my Human. I ate one. She bought a different brand and I chewed the seat belt. I prefer my crate but it’s too big to go in the sedan. Now she’s talkin’ about gettin’ a different strap attachment that is longer. Do you think she thinks I won’t find a way to outsmart the dang thing? (smirk)”

LOL! Chewing through harnesses is a common problem. We usually provide a tip sheet for people who buy a pet car harness in order to give some ideas on how to keep a dog from chewing through or escaping from it. One tip is training the dog to get used to the harness. This can take time. A short-term solution is to use a no-chew spray on the harness. And your idea of a longer strap is a good one too. Here’s a link to an article we wrote on the subject a couple years ago – Tips to Keep Your Dog from Chewing on His Dog Car Harness.

Just so you know, there is no such thing as a safe chew-proof or escape-proof pet car harness. The only chew-proof material I can think of is Kong material or metal. I can’t imagine metal being safe. I don’t know how safe a hard rubber one would be. One hasn’t been invented or tested yet, as far as I know. Escape-proof is difficult as well. Imagine if the harness is too tight. This would be uncomfortable for the dog and the dog would be even more likely to try to get out of it if he is uncomfortable. And if he did try to get out of a pet car harness that is too tight, he will be more likely to hurt himself.

Follow up on questions received by telephone or email this week:

Sarah asked whether I like the Kurgo or the Bergan brand pet car harness the best. This is a very common question and it is difficult to answer. I like both of them for different reasons. I like how the Bergan fits Pierson. He has a small frame and both the neck and the chest straps are fully adjustable. I also like the Bergan’s tether for Maya because she likes to move around a lot. I like how the Kurgo fits Maya. The large size is like it was made just for a Lab. But I don’t like the Kurgo tether for Maya. It works well on Pierson and I like how it is shorter and safer for him. But the Kurgo looped tether just won’t work for Maya.

If someone asks how I like the Ruff Rider Roadie, I honestly haven’t tried it on Maya and Pierson yet. I really like how padded the Bergan and Kurgo is. The Ruff Rider isn’t. But the quality if the Ruff Rider Roadie is obvious. It has a lot of features that the Kurgo and Bergan don’t seem to have. It is pleated under the dog’s legs so that it doesn’t cause irritation. The strap can be made short or long. And the strap can be used with the seat belt of the car as well as in the cargo area of the SUV (The Bergan tether can too).

Follow up on southern Florida as a pet friendly travel destination:

Gizmo from Terrier Torrent loves Florida and says his favorite part is the Jupiter dog beach. Flea from DogTreatWeb for Jones Natural Chews has only experience central Florida and was not at all impressed. She says central Florida was not at all dog friendly. Pamela with Something Wagging This Way Comes says that she’s had luck finding dog friendly tours up north, but not dog friendly sailing tours. That’s too bad because I’m sure her dog Sunny would love to go.

Do you have any pet travel safety questions? What about a favorite pet friendly travel destination? Feel free to chime in on the comments below or email us at naturebydawn@aol.com.

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July 26, 2013

We didn’t have many pet travel safety questions this past week. Our dog blog is more of an informational blog and doesn’t inspire a lot of comments. We do have a lot of readers, though. And our readers generally prefer to ask their questions by email or phone.

Which Size Dog Safety Belt Should I Get?

An important question that came up and comes up often is, how do you know what size of dog safety belt to get? This is not always easy since each manufacturer determines its own size standards. Take the recent review on the Kurgo Go-Tech pet seat belt. The medium size should fit most dogs between 25 and 50 pounds, but there are so many different shapes and sizes of dogs within this range that it is impossible for this size to fit them all. Consider a Bulldog, and then consider a Whippet. Both could fit within Kurgo’s medium weight range. But the neck of a Whippet is so small and narrow while the Bulldog’s is thick. I doubt the medium Kurgo Go-Tech would fit the Whippet while it might fit the Bulldog perfectly.

The medium Kurgo Tru-Fit style, on the other hand, might fit both dogs since the neck size is adjustable. The Ruff Rider Roadie also has an adjustable neck size (except smaller sizes). For both the Kurgo and the Ruff Rider Roadie, the most important size measurement is the girth size. The girth size is the measurement around your dog’s chest just behind the front legs. See how to measure your dog’s girth (chest) below.

Maya's Measurement for Dog Seat Belt

Maya gets her girth measured to see what size of dog seat belt is right for her.

The Bergan dog safety belt is the most flexible when it comes to sizing. Both the neck and the chest sizes are fully adjustable. It doesn’t matter if you’re an Italian Greyhound or a Mastiff. It is the weight of the dog that is most important. However, the small Bergan may be too big for really tiny dogs like Chihuahuas. And while the extra-large Bergan is the largest of all the extra-large size brands we have, it still may be too small for really big dogs with a chest (girth) size greater than 50 inches around.

Pros and Cons of Each Brand of Seat Belts for Dogs

Gizmo from Terrier Torrent commented about a recent review we posted on the new Kurgo Go-Tech harness. He liked how the review listed both the pros and the cons. We like it to. What works for me and my dogs may not work for you and yours. There are a lot of factors to consider. Check out our post from February 16th, 2013 where we attempt to list the pros and cons of our four most popular brands – Compare Pet Seat Belt Brands. This post does not yet include the Kurgo Go-Tech since this is a brand new style.

Help us out for the next Follow Up Friday by asking more questions about pet travel safety. Don’t just ask about seat belts for dogs. Ask about other products. And ask us some general pet travel questions too. We’d love to help. 🙂 And we will give you the pros as well as the cons.

Thank you, Heart Like a Dog, for hosting the Follow Up Friday blog hop!

 

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June 29, 2013

Dogs Wearing Dog Car Harnesses

Are Dog Car Harnesses Really Safe?

Some of you may have seen the news about the crash test failure of seat belts for dogs. This test was a pilot test completed in 2011 by a nonprofit organization called the Center for Pet Safety (CPS). While the initial pilot test reveals some frightening results, you will be glad to know that a lot of wonderful things have happened and are happening as a result of the test completed by this great organization.

More on the 2011 Dog Seat Belt Pilot Test

This is the test that is making all the headlines and causing a lot of people question whether a seat belt for their dog is really a good idea. Let me make four quick points about this test before moving on to the wonderful news.

1. The pilot test only included four out of dozens of pet safety restraint brands. And CPS does not disclose what those brands were. The results of only four brands should not be applied to all brands.

2. The result of this pilot test has spurred a number of companies to make improvements on their seat belts for dogs.

3. Having your dog wear a pet safety belt still prevents driver distractions.

4. Since there is no standard for testing, reputable manufacturers have done their best to test with the current knowledge and resources available to them.

You can read more on our website at http://www.petautosafety.com/Are-Dog-Car-Harnesses-Safe.

Manufacturers of Dog Car Harnesses Make Improvements

***The following four companies are from the brands that we sell. These do not represent the four brands conducted by CPS in their pilot test.

Kurgo – Shortly after this study was published, Kurgo came out with new dog car harnesses with steel buckles instead of plastic. We also know, from speaking with the Kurgo company directly, that they are working closely with CPS. They not only give them their products for further testing, but they also consult with them on ways to make their products better. Having sold Kurgo products for some time, I know Kurgo is a very innovative company that is greatly concerned about quality. After all, they do have a lifetime guarantee on all their products.

Bergan – Bergan is another brand we sell, so we have also spoken with them about CPS. They met with them earlier this month and are excited about what CPS is doing. They, too, will be paying close attention to what this organization finds in their continued studies, and are open to making any improvements based on study results, if indeed improvements are needed.

Ruff Rider Roadie – Another great product we sell, Ruff Rider has recently published a video showing how their seat belts for dogs have passed the preliminary tests conducted by CPS. View it here – http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=7QflhiutYX8.

Pet Buckle – This company has long since been supported by another nonprofit organization, Bark BuckleUP (Ruff Rider has too). I called them and left a message for someone to call me back, but they have not returned my call yet.

It is our understanding that many companies are voluntarily working with CPS, not just the four listed above.

We have been keeping tabs on the Center for Pet Safety since before they released their initial pilot test results. From both a business standpoint and a personal view, we have been both frightened by and excited about what this nonprofit organization is doing. We were worried about the quality of products we sold, but we were also happy to see there is finally an organization that will make it easier for us to determine what safety standards are best for our furry friends. Knowing that Bergan, Kurgo, and Ruff Rider are working with CPS makes us very happy and we worry no more.

As both a business and a consumer, we are in full support of the Center for Pet Safety. We will continue to keep tabs on what this nonprofit organization is doing. Be assured that whatever the results are, we will react in a way that benefits you and your pet the most. After all, our dogs wear dog car harnesses too and we want nothing but the best for them.

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Compare Pet Travel Harness Brands

Author: MayaAndPierson
February 16, 2013
Dog Seat Belt

Which dog seat belt is right for your pet?

Since we have now added the Ruff Rider Roadie and are phasing out the Guardian Gear / Cruising Companion brand dog seat belts, we are doing a new comparison. We now have four quality brands of dog car harnesses to choose from:  Bergan, Kurgo Tru-Fit, Pet Buckle, and Roadie. Which one is best? They are all great, but each has a different style and feature. Compare them below:

Quality
Quality is hard to quantify. All of these four brands are well-made with strong materials. While some or all parts may have been constructed outside the United States, each of the companies that make these brands has strict quality control measures in place to ensure that each and every dog seat belt meets the same high standards.

Safety
Since each of these brands has been tested by a different strength and crash test specialist, it is difficult to determine which dog seat belt brand is the safest. We are confident in the safety and crash testing of each of these brands.
* Bergan was tested using the V9DT Pet Safety Durability standard.
* Kurgo Tru-Fit enhanced version was tested by the New Hampshire Materials Laboratory, Inc.
* Pet Buckle was tested by the Center for Advanced Product Evaluation (CAPE).
* Roadie Ruff Rider was tested by both the Commercial Test Labs and the Allianz Insurance Crash Research Center.

Fit
Can dogs get out of them? Yes to all. A determined dog can get out of any pet travel harness. Keeping the seat belt harness too tight will not prevent this and will likely only make a dog more determined to get out of it. So when we look at how it fits, we are looking for any loose spots or any place that doesn’t adjust well.
* Bergan – Fits well and adjustable at both the neck and sides, although the chest piece may be a little long for some dogs.
* Kurgo Tru-Fit – Fits well and is adjustable at both the neck and sides.
* Pet Buckle – Fits well on small dogs or large dogs. It does not fit medium-sized dogs.
* Ruff Rider Roadie – Fits well, and all except the smaller sizes are adjustable at both the neck and sides.

How it Works
* Bergan – Uses an adjustable length tether with a carabiner clip to attach directly to the seat belt webbing of the car.
* Kurgo Tru-Fit – Uses a loop that the seat belt of the car goes through.
* Pet Buckle – Uses a loop tether for the seat belt of the car to go through. An adjustable length Kwik Connect tether may be included. This tether clips directly onto the latchbar between the seat cushions of vehicles 2001 and later.
* Ruff Rider Roadie – Uses a loop tether for the seat belt of the car to go through.

Bergan Tether

How the carabiner clip on the Bergan tether works with the seat belt in your car.

Kurgo Tru-Fit Tether Loop

How the Kurgo Tru-Fit tether loop works with the seat belt of your car. The Ruff Rider and Pet Buckle works in a similar way.

Kwik-Connect Tether for Pet Buckle

How the Kwik-Connect tether of the Pet Buckle works in your car.

Ease of Use
In trying out each of these brands, we have not found one that is particularly easier to put on than the others. All take a little thought when putting them on for the first time, but once you get a hang of it all of them are easy.

Distinguishing Features
* Bergan – Padded chest piece; since no loop tether, tangling is less likely.
* Kurgo Tru-Fit – Slightly padded; enhanced version has steel buckles; allows for harness to also be used as a walking harness.
* Pet Buckle – Metal buckles; if the Kwik-Connect tether is used, tangling is less likely.
* Ruff Rider Roadie – No plastic parts; tested to ensure there is no pressure on dog’s throat; pleated design on straps under dog’s legs to prevent irritation; tether and harness is one piece and tether can be used as a short walking leash.

Price
Listed from least expensive to most expensive:
* Bergan
* Kurgo Tru-Fit
* Pet Buckle
* Roadie Ruff Rider

If you have any questions regarding any other differences in these pet travel harness brands, please email us at naturebydawn@aol.com. We have had the opportunity to use these on our own dogs, including my own:  Sephi wore the Kurgo, Maya wears the Kurgo with a Bergan tether (to prevent tangling), and Pierson wears the Bergan. 🙂

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January 12, 2013

We’ve been looking at this dog car harness for some time. The company that makes them has been around for nearly 20 years. And their products have been safety tested, with a new and improved version now available. We’re not sure what took us so long to finally offer this product but the Ruff Rider Roadie is finally here!

Benefits for Your Pet

* Designed to put pressure on your dog’s chest rather than his throat.

* Safety, strength, and crash tested by two auto safety institutions.

* Pleating on the harness part under your dog’s legs to reduce chaffing.

* Design input for both ease of use and safety from a veterinary orthopedic surgeon.

* No plastic parts.

* Tether strap has two length options.

Visit our dog car harness page and click on the picture of the white dog wearing the Ruff Rider Roadie (also pictured above). Compare it to our other safety and crash tested dog car harness brands. If you choose to buy it, use discount code petfriend to get 10% off!

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