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March 10, 2015

Highlight on Crash Tested Pet Travel Products

Lucky Maya Green Kurgo TruFit Dog Car Harness

Do you like taking your dog with you when you travel? I know our family vacations tend to be planned around our dogs. We generally travel by car to places within driving distance. If our destination is hours away, we stay over at pet friendly hotels to break up the trip. And just like for ourselves, we don’t count on luck to protect the safety of our dogs. We use crash tested pet travel products. There are only a few such products out in the market today. Let us give you a highlight of a few.

Variocage Dog Travel Cage for SUVs

Variocage

The Variocage is a pet travel cage that is fitted into the cargo area of an SUV. It is a German engineered product of steel construction and it has been extensively tested to meet or exceed European crash test standards. Unlike similar cages for the SUV, the Variocage has been crash tested for multiple auto accident scenarios. (Many other crash tested cages currently on the market have only been tested with basic techniques.) The Variocage has metal joints rather than plastic. The powder-coated steel doesn’t splinter into dangerous projectiles. The cage has crumple zones to absorb impacts and keep the cage from being crushed into the back of the front passengers. Two cons to consider: 1) Price (which is a reflection of its crashworthiness), and 2) Assembly required.

Sleepypod Pet Carrier in Seat Belt

Sleepypod

The Sleepypod pet car seat is for smaller dogs. The seat is secured using the seat belt of the car, which is more than strong enough to secure a small pet. The Sleepypod is made of soft but highly durable material that absorbs your pet’s inertia in a crash without breaking. The absorption of the material means your small dog won’t hurt himself the way he would if he hit the wall of a plastic carrier. The Sleepypod Air is similar to the regular Sleepypod in all respects except it is rectangular rather than circular. Two cons to consider: 1) For cats or very small dogs only, and 2) Tends to run out of stock frequently.

Pierson Wearing ClickIt Sport Dog Car Harness

ClickIt

The ClickIt Utility and ClickIt Sport dog car harnesses are fairly new pet travel products (from Sleepypod). According to the Center for Pet Safety, they provide ultimate crash test safety by keeping your dog in his seat during a crash. Side-to-side motion is restricted and your dog will not launch off the seat. Two cons to consider: 1) It can be difficult to put on your dog, especially the ClickIt Utility, and 2) It is highly restrictive and probably not ideally comfortable for long road trips. In fact, your dog can only sit or lay down in this harness. He cannot stand.

Maya Labrador AllSafe Dog Car Harness

AllSafe

The AllSafe dog car harness is German engineered and has been used in Europe for over 10 years. According to the Center for Pet Safety, which is a fairly new US testing center, it does not prevent your dog from launching off the seat. But European standards have been in place much longer and have concluded that this not an issue. Also, the AllSafe is not as restrictive as the previously mentioned brand. Your dog can sit, stand, or lay down. Two cons to consider: 1) Price as compared to other crash tested harnesses, and 2) Movement is still restricted, which may not be ideal for hyper dogs. A longer tether can be purchased for the AllSafe, but keep in mind that less restriction reduces the safety.

Pierson on Flat Seat Wearing Ruff Rider Roadie

Ruff Rider Roadie

The Ruff Rider Roadie is a US dog car harness brand (made in the USA) and has been around for several years. It has been crash tested in both the US and in Germany. The tether on this harness can be shortened or lengthened for your dog’s needs. The Ruff Rider is designed to fit almost every size of dog. A con to consider: If the harness is adjusted too small, it can be difficult to put on. Since it is designed to be a little loose, some dogs may be able to back out of it.

Bergan & Kurgo

The Bergan and Kurgo brand dog seat belts have also been crash tested. Although they did not perform as well in safety as the three previously mentioned brands, they do provide some measure of safety and they are reasonably priced. Both have padded chest pads, which help to dissipate pressure. The tether for the Bergan is adjustable. A con to consider for the Kurgo is if dogs move around too much in this harness, they can get tangled in the tethering mechanism.

If you are considering traveling with your dog this spring, don’t count on luck to keep him safe. Consider a crash tested product that will keep your best friend safe in the car for years to come.

Where are you and your dog going to go this spring?

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January 13, 2015

Pierson Wearing ClickIt Sport Dog Car Harness

In an independent crash test study completed by the Center for Pet Safety in 2013, the ClickIt Utility dog seat belt from Sleepypod was rated as the safest brand out of eleven popular brands. Indeed, upon using the ClickIt Utlity for ourselves, we found it secured our dogs very well. But there were a few inconvenient issues that make people turn away from it. And so, Sleepypod redesigned a better harness called the ClickIt Sport.

MEASURING
The issues with the ClickIt Utility aren’t safety issues, but issues with use. For one, the measuring method is not as simple as with other brands and people were often confused about what to measure. The ClickIt Sport dog car harness has a much easier measuring method. All one has to do is measure around the barrel of the dog’s chest behind the front legs.

SIZING
The ClickIt Utility is also difficult to adjust for size. Despite Sleepypod’s videos, many people had a hard time getting the harness to fit their dog properly. The ClickIt Sport is much easier to adjust so it can fit perfectly without much trouble.

Maya Wearing ClickIt Sport Dog Seat Belt

PUTTING IT ON
Relatively speaking, putting on the ClickIt Utility harness is about the same as putting on any other dog car harness. You basically have to put the harness over your dog’s head and then physically put his front legs through the openings. Some dogs are less than cooperative. The ClickIt Sport is a little easier. Have your dog sit, put the harness under him with his front feet in the leg spaces, then pull it up and buckle it.

SECURING IN THE CAR
A dog wearing the ClickIt Utility has to be secured in three different places in the car. Firstly, the seat belt of the car goes through the back. Then two side straps are connected to the baby seat latch bars. So if someone’s car doesn’t have the latch bars, then they can’t use this car harness. Trying to secure a dog at all three points is difficult and frustrating for some. With the ClickIt Sport, all you have to do is put the seat belt of the car through the back. There are no side straps.

SAFETY
Nothing has changed regarding safety. The ClickIt Sport has passed all the same tests as the ClickIt Utility and has received a CPS Certification authenticating its safety.

If you’re looking for a dog seat belt and are put off by some of the negative reviews about the ClickIt Utility, consider the new ClickIt Sport instead. It’s just as safe, but much easier to use. It is still very restrictive, but this is what makes it so safe.

Pierson Wearing ClickIt Sport Dog Car Seat Belt Harness

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September 16, 2014

My Dogs in Back of SUV

Having your dog wear a dog seat belt in the vehicle is a great way to keep them from distracting the driver. But you also want them to be safe, right? However, if your dog rides in the cargo area of your hatchback or SUV, you need to know that securing them to cargo rings may not be adequate.

The Center for Pet Safety, a nonprofit research facility for pet products, has recently reported that cargo connections may not have the necessary strength to hold your dog. This means the cargo ring can break if your dog is in a car accident, or even if your dog just pulls on it hard enough. Contact the vehicle manufacturer to find out what amount of force those cargo rings can withstand.

When we rented an SUV one year in order to make our annual trip from Kansas to Texas, we looked diligently for an SUV that had metal connections in the cargo area for Maya and Pierson. We did not find any. As a result, we found a way to connect their dog seat belt harnesses to the safety belt housing of the car located under the seat. However, the Center for Pet Safety advises against this as well.

If you need to have your dog ride in the cargo area, you may need to install a more secure connection in the cargo area. You can also opt to have your dog ride in a crate instead. Just be sure the crate can be secured in place.

We will soon have another option for dogs riding in cargo areas. By the end of September, you will see the VarioCage available on our PetAutoSafety.com retail site. The VarioCage is very expensive but it is also extremely durable. It has been extensively crash tested and even real-life situations have shown that the VarioCage remains intact.

Safety for our pets when we travel is very important and vehicle manufacturers are coming to realize this. More and more car commercials show a dog harnessed in the car. So if you have a vehicle with a cargo area and it doesn’t have cargo rings or just has plastic cargo rings, tell the manufacturer that you want this feature. You may not be able to get it this time around, but they will hear you and hopefully install better connections in future models.

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August 5, 2014

Pierson Pet Flat Seat Ruff Rider

Pierson has actually been using the Ruff Rider Roadie for some time. He actually has several dog car harness brands to choose from, but I’ve been using the Roadie almost exclusively since that report from the Center for Pet Safety came out in October 2013. Besides safety, there are a lot of other reasons why I love this brand. So let me share them with you, along with some opposing features.

SAFETY
The Center for Pet Safety did an independent crash test study of various dog seat belt brands in October 2013, and I’m happy to say that the Roadie did very well. They determined the ClickIt Utility to be the safest and the Roadie and the AllSafe followed 2nd. This information makes me feel better about my boy Pierson’s safety.

COMFORT
One thing about the safest ClickIt Utility brand is that it is also the most restrictive. You dog can’t stand up in it and will have a difficult time moving from the sitting to the laying down position. This restriction is a good thing in safety, but let’s face it, many dogs do not like to be that restricted. One great thing about the Ruff Rider Roadie is that it can allow your dog a little more freedom to move. Its tether has two setting, one that makes the tether very short and one that makes it a little longer. With the longer option, your dog can sit, stand, and lay down with ease. Pierson is good about staying in one place in the car, so I generally use the shorter tether option.

Ruff Rider Roadie Dog Car Harness on Pierson

MADE IN USA
Nope, the ClickIt Utility is not made in the USA. Neither is the AllSafe. But the Ruff Rider Roadie dog seat belt is made right here in the United States. And it has been around and continuously improving for 15 years.

FITS ALL SIZES
Pierson is a medium sized dog, so he doesn’t have a problem in sizing. But you should know the ClickIt and the AllSafe are not made to fit very small dogs. The Roadie, on the other hand, does fit little pets.

CONSTRUCTION
The Roadie pet car harness is very well made. The material is a very strong webbing, yet not bulky. The size adjusting buckle is plastic, but this buckle is not part of what keeps the harness on your dog. If it breaks, your dog will still be in his harness.

DESIGN
The Roadie does not have a padded chest piece like the ClickIt or AllSafe. But the cross piece is designed to lie low on your dog’s chest so that it doesn’t choke him. Pierson likes it because it’s comfortable without being bulky.

CONS?
Because the Ruff Rider Roadie pet seat belt isn’t put on with clasps, it can be a bit difficult to put on. Luckily, my Pierson is very cooperative. He’s been wearing dog car harnesses since the day I got him, so he allows me to slip the Roadie on and put each of his legs in the leg holes. If you have a dog that doesn’t hold still well or is likely to resist, then you may have a challenge in putting this one on.

Because the Roadie doesn’t have clasps and because it has to be adjusted loose enough to put on your dog, it fits a little loose. This is actually a good thing. You don’t want a harness that is too tight. If you have a dog that keeps trying to get out of his dog seat belt, a tighter fit is not going to stop him from trying. The tighter it is, the more likely he is to hurt himself when he tries to get out of it. With training, a dog is more likely to get used to a loosely comfortable harness than a tight fitting one.

The Ruff Rider Roadie has seven different sizes. This makes it a bit difficult in determining which size to get your dog. At the same time, because it has so many different sizes, it is likely to fit many more dog breeds than other brands.

When shopping for the right pet car harness for you and your dog, look at safety, but also be aware of the possible cons. The Ruff Rider Roadie is almost perfect because it has such a high safety rating yet only a few cons. It is also very competitively priced. I love the Roadie. And although Pierson is not thrilled with the process of me putting it on him, he is very comfortable in it once it is on.

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Dog Car Seat Belts: Safe or Unsafe

Author: MayaAndPierson
June 18, 2014
Maya ClickIt Utility Dog Seat Belt

The ClickIt Utility was rated the number one safest dog car harness by The Center for Pet Safety in 2013.

In 2013, Subaru of America and the Center for Pet Safety teamed up to test dog safety-harnesses. Their main goal was to ensure pets are kept safe while being transported and that each manufacturer’s claims of “crash protection” are valid, and able to perform as promised. Throughout the 2013 Safety Harness Crashworthiness Study, a range of harnesses, which the manufacturers claimed were “Testing”,“Crash Testing” or offered “Crash Protection”, were tested to determine if their statements were true and correct.

It should be noted, the Center for Pet Safety ran a preliminary crash study test in 2011. Four safety harnesses were tested. All four failed to provide proper protection for their canine counterpart. Admittedly, this study was not thorough enough to provide helpful statistical information regarding the use of safety harnesses, as only four undisclosed brands were tested, while there were over a dozen brands on the market at the time. The unintended, yet virtuous, outcome of this testing is that many of the top harness manufacturers have become more rigorous with their own safety testing, and have made improvements to their existing products.

Out of the seven brands that were found to be stable enough to test in the 2013 study, the clear top performer is the Clickit Utility, which is manufactured by Sleepypod. While the Clickit Utility provides the best protection against car accidents, it limits range of motion to the extreme. Some dogs may get anxious if forced to use the Clickit Utility, which may cause them to panic and hurt themselves or encourage chewing through the safety device. That being said, some dogs may not mind the harness, or with proper training could be desensitized to wearing it. While the Clickit Utility passed the test with flying colors, it isn’t for every dog. There are other options that met the safety standards set in place by the Center for Pet Safety, like Klein Metal’s AllSafe Harness or Cover Craft’s RuffRider Roadie.

The danger associated with auto accidents does not only apply to our pets. Safety regulations for people regarding seatbelt use has been in place for decades, yet there are many cases in which the use of a seatbelt has caused injury or has still resulted in death. Each car accident is unique, and no matter how much safety testing is done, there is always a risk involved. This does not stop people from wearing seatbelts, and it should not stop us from strapping our dogs in.

Having extra protection, such as a dog car safety harness, not only provides peace of mind, but keeps dogs in place. At the very least, your strapped in dog will be less of a distraction while you are driving, reducing your risk of getting into an accident in the first place. There are other methods to restrain your dog in the car, such as crates, barriers, fencing and screens. These will also help provide distraction-free driving, but they have not been properly tested, and it cannot be concluded that they will keep your pet safe in the case of an accident.

The Center for Pet Safety is leading the way in discovering the best way to keep people and their pets safe while traveling. Their research is still in an early phase, with only two studies under their belt. Without prior data, it is hard to conclude what testing method will provide the most accurate information. The methods will surely be modified in the future, meaning we will be able to make more informed decisions regarding the safety of our dogs as time goes on.

By Patrice Marrero

Source: Newswire Today

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2013 Comparison of Dog Car Seat Belts

Author: MayaAndPierson
October 14, 2013
Compare Five Dog Seat Belt Brands

Dog seat belt brands listed left to right, top to bottom: ClickIt Utility, Ruff Rider Roadie, Bergan, Kurgo Tru-Fit, Kurgo Go-Tech.

The study that evaluated the safety of canine car harnesses completed by the Center for Pet Safety has made it much easier for us to determine which brand really is the best. But the best may not always be the right one for you and your dog. So here are some other comparisons for you to consider when looking for the perfect way for your best friend to ride in the car. Please note, our comparison only covers dog car seat belts we currently have available at Pet Auto Safety.

QUALITY
Quality goes nearly hand-in-hand with safety. While most brands appear to be well made, only a couple of them held up in all three crash test weights conducted by the Center for Pet Safety (CPS). So when considering quality, consider safety.

SAFETY
The following is a list of the dog car seat belts rating from the safest to the least effective as according to CPS:
ClickIt Utility
– Ruff Rider Roadie
– Bergan
– Kurgo Tru-Fit
– Kurgo Go-Tech
– Pet Buckle
– Guardian Gear (our standard brand)
The Kurgo Go-Tech was not part of the study conducted by CPS (see their full report from CPS here). However, it is very much like the Tru-Fit in style and make. Pet Buckle failed the safety tests conducted by CPS. Guardian Gear was not tested by CPS but we know for a fact that these canine car harnesses have not been tested for safety by the manufacturer. They are primarily used to help prevent driver distractions and to help keep a dog from getting thrown around in a sudden stop or swerve.

PRICE
As would be expected, the price generally reflects the quality and safety. The following brands are listed from most expensive to least expensive:
– ClickIt Utility – $90 – $100
– Ruff Rider Roadie – $43 – $55
– Pet Buckle – $28 – $55
– Bergan – $24 – $35
– Kurgo Go-Tech – $22 – $32
– Kurgo – Tru-Fit – $20 – $30
– Guardian Gear – $13 – $20

EASE OF USE
All these pet safety belt brands seem difficult to put on your dog when putting them on for the first time. Even the second and third attempt can be difficult. But once you get used to it, all of them are easy. I do think, however, with the ClickIt Utility’s three attachment points that securing your dog in the car with this brand takes slightly more effort than the others do. But it is not difficult once you get a hang of it.

HOW THEY WORK
There are three different ways to secure your dog in the car with a pet safety belt:
1.
Use the safety belt of your car and run it through a loop on the harness. This method is used by the Ruff Rider Roadie, Kurgo, Pet Buckle, and is one of the three attachment points used by the ClickIt Utility. The ClickIt, however, doesn’t actually run through a loop. It runs through the harness straps itself.

Kurgo Tru-Fit Tether Loop

The seat belt of your car goes through a loop on the tether of certain dog seat belt brands.

Back of the ClickIt Dog Seat Belt

The seat belt of your car goes through the back of the ClickIt as one of three attachment points of the harness.

2. Connect the harness tether to the latchbar located between the seat cushions of 2001 to newer vehicle models. This method can be used by the Ruff Rider Roadie with their included caribiner clip, Bergan with the caribiner clip on its tether, Pet Buckle if the Kwik-Connect tether is used, and it is the other two attachment points used by the ClickIt.

Kwik-Connect Tether for Pet Buckle

The Kwik-Connect tether clips onto the latchbar located between the cushions rear car seats (2001 and newer models).

Tether of the ClickIt Utility Dog Safety Belt

These two tethers attach to the latchbars located between the rear seat cushions, and in turn attach to the sides of the ClickIt Utility dog safety belt.

3. Connect directly to the seat belt. The Bergan brand does this by clipping the carabiner in between the webbing of the seat belt receptacle. The Kurgo brand has a direct to seat belt connector that is sold separately and buckles directly into the seat belt receptacle. The Guardian Gear brand buckles directly into the seat belt receptacle as well.

3 Bergan Tether Attachment

The caribiner clip of the Bergan tether can clip between the webbing of the seat belt receptacle.

Buckle Strap for Dog Car Harness

The Kurgo direct to seat belt tether buckles directly into the seat belt receptacle.

The ClickIt must use the first two connection methods. The other brands that have more than one possible connection method must use one method or the other.

FITTING
– ClickIt – Adjusts at both the neck and the chest. The vest piece for the extra small and small may be too bulky for smaller dogs with narrow chests or short bodies. It measures 9 inches long and the narrowest part of the vest is 3.5 inches wide. Despite the sizing indications, the extra small and small is not intended for very small dogs.
– Ruff Rider Roadie – Adjusts at the neck and the chest for medium through extra-large sizes. The neck on the small sizes is not adjustable.
– Bergan – Adjusts at both the neck and the chest. The vest piece for the small may be too bulky for smaller dogs. The harness does not fit very small dogs. The extra-large harness is the largest of all our extra-large harness brands.
– Kurgo Tru-Fit – Adjusts at the neck and the chest.
– Kurgo Go-Tech – Adjusts at the chest only. The harness will be loose at the neck for dogs with a really narrow neck.
– Pet Buckle – Adjusts at the chest and neck. The large size can be adjusted to fit medium-sized dogs but is generally too heavy because of the buckles. Therefore, this brand is only suitable for larger small breeds, or larger medium to large breeds.
Guardian Gear – All styles are adjustable at the chest. Some styles may or may not be adjustable at the neck.

Dog car seat belts we did not consider in our comparison but rated well in safety according to CPS include the Allsafe and RC Pet. Allsafe did as well as the Ruff Rider Roadie and RC Pet rated as well as the Bergan. We did not include these brands in our comparison because we have no experience with them.

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October 5, 2013
ClickIt Utility Seat Belt for Dogs 1

Enter to win this ClickIt Utility seat belt for dogs.

Enter to Win the ClickIt Utility Pet Car Harness

Do you want to be one of the first people to try out the new ClickIt Utility seat belt for dogs from Sleepypod? Great! Just enter the Rafflecopter below.

This seat belt for dogs did not fail! It was the top performing pet car harness as conducted by the Center for Pet Safety and shown in their October 2013 report (see our post on October 3rd). The ClickIt Utility is unique in that it has a three point attachment system designed to keep your dog more stable in the event of a car accident. It has been crash tested at 30mph using a 75lb dog dummy. Watch the following crash test video to see how the ClickIt keeps your dog on the seat.

For other valuable safety information on this new products, visit our website’s ClickIt Utility pet car harnesses page and check out our post from September 28, 2013 to see how well it worked for my dog Maya.

Before you enter, make sure your dog is big enough to wear one. The extra-small and small sizes are really for smaller medium sized dogs. Sleepypod recommends that smaller dogs should be ride in a pet carrier such as their Sleepypod pet car seat.

To determine if your dog is big enough, measure around his chest and neck in a figure-8 as shown in the diagram below. Also, watch the following video. If your dog’s figure-8 measurement is less than 31 inches, then he is too small for the ClickIt Utility seat belt for dogs.

ClickIt Harness Sizing

Starting at the top, wrap the tape measure around your dog’s chest, then neck, in a figure-8.

Contest Rules and Guidelines:

1. Contest ends at 11:59pm October 31st, 2013.

2. Please don’t enter your dog in the contest if he is too small to fit the ClickIt Utility harness unless you plan to give it to a friend or donate it. See measuring instructions above.

3. The mailing address for the winner must be in the US. If you live outside the US but have a US shipping address or have someone in the US who will ship to you, then you may enter the contest.

4. One of the Rafflecopter entries will let you enter more than once. Multiple entries are permitted.

5. If you already like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter, you can simply indicate on the Rafflecopter for a valid entry.

6. Your Like and Follow must be active at the time of the drawing.

7. We will choose the winner using Random.org. The winner will be contacted via all methods provided such as email, Facebook message, and/or Twitter direct messaging. You have three business days to reply or another winner will be selected.

8. The ClickIt Utility has been so popular that most sizes and colors are out of stock by both us and Sleepypod. So your prize may not be sent until more are available in mid to late November.

a Rafflecopter giveaway

Good luck! 🙂

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Follow Up Friday #14

Author: MayaAndPierson
October 4, 2013

Follow Up Friday Banner Logo

Friday is here again! It’s time to recap the past week’s events. And let me tell you, it has been an eventful week. Before I get to that, though, let me thank Jodi with Heart Like a Dog and Lynda from Two Ears and a Tail for hosting the Follow Up Friday blog hop. Thanks! 🙂

There were a lot of great comments from last week’s Follow Up Friday. One that needs special mention is the one from Flea with DogTreatWeb for Jones Natural Chews. She knows we go from Kansas to Texas and back every year and that we drive through Oklahoma on the way. So she invited us to stop by on the way back! I’m so excited!!! I can’t wait to meet Flash, Patches, Jimmy, and all the lovely hens. And Flea would love to meet Pierson. So be sure to subscribe to our blog so you don’t miss the post about our trip at the end of December.

Maya ClickIt Utility Pet Seat Belt

My Maya looks happy in her new ClickIt pet seat belt, but she is not too thrilled about not being able to move around much anymore. At least she is safer this way.

The New ClickIt Utility Dog Safety Belt is Here!

I knew the ClickIt Utility was going to be nice but I didn’t really expect it to work well enough to keep my Maya in her seat. She is a crazy dog and likes to stand up and move around. This is the first pet car harness that keeps her in her seat. I really truly love it!

Ms. Phoebe the cat had a good question about the ClickIt Utility. She asked if her 70lb doggie sister would be able to lie down in the harness. The answer is yes. My Labrador Maya wanted to move around so badly, but the only thing she could do to move was to lie down. Having the Kurgo Backseat Bridge in place might help my big girl be able to lie down in the forward facing position without hanging off the seat. (The photo of Maya above does not show the Kurgo Backseat Bridge because I took the photo in my husband’s car. My car is a 1998 and does not have the latch system.)

Snoopy with Snoopy’s dog blog asked if the dog safety belt harness could also be used as a walking harness. Yes, Snoopy, it can. It has a ring on the back to allow for this. It does not, however, have a ring in the front like the Kurgo harness does.

Roxi asked if her 75lb German Shepherd and 30lb mixed breed could both ride in the back seat while wearing this pet car harness. Yes, Roxi, both can ride in the back seat. All vehicles 2001 model and later have the latchbar system in place for baby car seats. This latchbar system consists of these metal anchors located between the seat cushions. For both the left and right side of the seat (but not the middle) there are two anchors.

There are no anchors in the front seat so your dog will not be able to wear the ClickIt in the front. Other brands, however, may work in the front seat. We usually do not recommend dogs in the front seat, though, because front passenger side airbags are not safe for dogs.

The Center for Pet Safety Report is Out

Remember the 2001 report where four harnesses failed, thereby mislabeling all pet seat belts as a failure? Well the October 2013 report showed that not all brands were failures. The ClickIt Utility dog safety belt got the highest marks. It outperformed all other brands. Other brands did okay and still others completely failed. If you haven’t read my post regarding this, please go check it out now. It was published October 3rd, 2013.

Callie, Shadow, and Ducky’s mom from SamsNorthernGirl blog mentioned a couple of dogs probably would not be comfortable wearing the ClickIt Utility dog safety belt because it is too restrictive. Both Callie and Shadow have mild hip dysplasia that could be aggravated by being forced to stay in one place. The restriction of this particular brand is definitely something people want to consider. While it is good to be as restricted in the car as much as possible in most cases, I can see how something like hip problems could be an exception.

Thankfully, other brands did not fail the test. A brand like the Ruff Rider Roadie harness may not have done as well as the ClickIt, but it did not fail the testing done by the Center for Pet Safety. There are other methods of keeping your dog safe in the car as well. A secured pet travel crate might be just as good as a harness. The Center for Pet Safety has not yet conducted studies on this but will. We will keep you posted.

Thank you all for stopping by and for your comments. The more we engage in conversations about the safety of our pets, the better things will get.

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The report from the Center for Pet Safety regarding the safety of pet car harnesses is finally out. The news is good in some ways but not so good in others. Before we give a brief summary of the report, let us remind you that injury to a dog in a car accident is much more likely if they are not harnessed at all. So even though a dog seat belt may have failed the Center for Pet Safety’s standards, something is better than nothing. See our post about what if a dog isn’t restrained in the car.

ClickIt Utility is the Top Performing Dog Seat Belt

The good news is that the ClickIt Utiltiy dog seat belt from Sleepypod is the top performer! It consistently passed all tests for all sizes, kept your dog in the seat, and restricted side-to-side movement. We recently acquired this brand and it is currently available on our retail site, free shipping.

Maya ClickIt Utility Dog Seat Belt

I was pleasantly surprised at how well the ClickIt Utility dog seat belt kepy my crazy dog Maya in her seat.

These next two brands did not fail, but they didn’t do as well as the ClickIt Utility: Allsafe and Ruff Rider. We have Ruff Rider Roadie available on our site, but not Allsafe.

These next brands failed in some ways, but not all:
– The Canine Friendly from RC Pet failed at the 75lb level for larger dogs.
– Bergan failed at the 75lb level for larger dogs.
– The Kurgo Tru-Fit failed at the 25lb and 75lb level but did well for the 45lb level for medium sized dogs.

We have the Bergan and Kurgo brands on our retail site. If the ClickIt Utility and Ruff Rider is a bit out of one’s price range, we suggest the Bergan for small dogs, and the Bergan or Kurgo for medium dogs. I believe Kurgo has just released a new dog seat belt for larger dogs. It is available on Kurgo’s site only at this time.

Pet Buckle failed at all sizes. They have also opted out of test attendance with the Center for Pet Safety. We will be discontinuing this brand.

These brands, which we do not sell, did not make it to the crash test level. The Center for Pet Safety determined their quality was not adequate enough to pass any crash test:  Champion from USA Canine Outfitters, Clix from In the Company of Animals, EZ-Rider from Coastal, and the Pet Safety Harness and Adapter from Snoozer.

For more detailed information, check out the full report from the Center for Pet Safety.

Since the ClickIt Utility dog seat belt is a brand new product, I do not feel that our company made a bad decision in the products we elected to sell. The only one of our products that claimed crash testing and completely failed was the Pet Buckle. When we first started selling Pet Buckle, it was the only brand which used metal buckles. It was innovative at the time. When new companies started arising we added them to our inventory but didn’t stop Pet Buckle. After all, Pet Buckle and the newer brands all made the same pet safety claims.

We’re glad we took up the Ruff Rider brand. And we still like the Bergan and Kurgo brands even though they did not hold up as well as the others. Not everyone is going to be able to afford the nearly $100 price of the ClickIt Utiltiy. Since something is still better than nothing, we will continue to sell the Bergan and Kurgo. However, we will be adding a disclosure regarding the Center for Pet Safety’s report on our site over the next few days.

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Follow Up Friday #12

Author: MayaAndPierson
September 20, 2013

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It’s time for another edition of Follow Up Friday where we recap the past week’s activities. This edition is hosted by Heart Like a Dog and 2 Brown Dawgs.

Comments from Follow Up Friday #11

Jodi with Heart Like a Dog saw someone driving while their dog had his whole upper body hanging out the window. How scary, Jodi! I hate it when I see something like that. 🙁

Oz the Terrier says, “Oh I so want one of the Clickits by Sleepypod. I don’t think we have the best harness for safety in the car at the moment…but we are trying.” Something is better than nothing, Oz so your efforts are pawsome! I think what I am going to do after we get the Sleepypod ClickIt is give one away. So keep an eye out!

By the way, I don’t think the Sleepypod ClickIt will make it on the Center for Pet Safety (CPS) report coming in October. It is too new so I doubt CPS has had a chance to test it. But Sleepypod has tested it. And the ClickIt was designed based on testing results from CPS.

We Life in a Flat says, “If we don’t let kids stick their heads out of the car window, why should we let dogs” Good point. Unfortunately, not everyone thinks of their dogs as family. Those of us that do, though, sometimes fall victim to the “It won’t happen to me” mentality.

Upcoming Pet Events

Sue with Talking-Dogs says she adopted her first dog at the Lawrence Humane Society (LHS). How pawsome is that!?! After Sephi passed on, my husband and I looked through the LHS for a new family member. All the dogs there were wonderful and well cared for. But none of them clicked. I ended up finding a stray (Pierson) instead. Excellent bargain, don’t you think?

Pierson January 10, 2012

This photo was taken on the day I brought Pierson to his new home. He was a scared pup. He was also thin and full of fleas and ticks. He doesn’t look thin. It’s all the hair. It was January 10, 2012 when I got him.

In regards to pet events, our first one this fall is coming up on Sunday. The event is outdoors and thankfully it looks like the weather is going to hold up. I’ll be sure to post photos the following Wednesday for Wordless Wednesday.

Pet Travel Destination Tuesday

Donna and the Dogs says “I try to take mine out places too, but like you, only if I don’t need to leave them unattended. Especially my Lab, Toby, and my Vizlsa, Medi, because I’m afraid someone will steal them.” That’s something else to think about besides the heat. Someone could steal your dog. Even if you live in a nice neighborhood, do you really trust that some unsavory person isn’t visiting your nice town and looking for some easy pickings? I also worry about people who don’t like dogs and what they will do to tease my dog if I am not there to watch them.

Lindsay with That Mutt says, “There is a dog bakery near us, and I am thinking about taking Ace there this week just for an excuse to get him a treat.” Sounds fun. I bet Ace will love it. I forgot to mention dog boutiques in my list. Maya has been to Lucky Paws Bakery in downtown Lawrence a number of times. There also used to be a place called The Dog House that we frequented.

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Maya and other dogs at the Lucky Paws Bakery located in Downtown Lawrence.

Buster & Pierson at The Dog House

Pierson met Buster at The Dog House. Pierson looks happy, but really, he is not happy that Buster is getting attention.

Mollie with Mollies Dog Treats says, “Mommy takes me with her but we never had ice cream this summer.. must make a note.” Hurry Mollie, before it’s too cold for ice cream. 🙂

Gizmo with Terrier Torrent says, “Gizmo loves car rides, even if it’s just a quick errand…he’s totally comfy in the car, which does make things easy.” Good job, Gizmo! Maya loves car rides too but she is so totally not easy to deal with in the car. Have you all seen this video?

Imagine this for the first 15 to 20 minutes of our annual road trip to Texas. She calms down eventually, but starts up all over again every time we make a pit stop. She is wearing her seat belt in this video but I have to keep the tether long so she won’t get tangled when she tries to move around. A shorter tether is safer, but Maya is a good example of how optimum safety is not always possible.

I discovered a new product last year that helped Maya with her excitement. The product is Travel Calm and it works well for nervous dogs too. The only time Maya whined on the last trip was when she recognized we were pulling into my parent’s neighborhood. After that trip, I made arrangements with the company that makes it to sell some on my own site.

Jodi with Heart Like a Dog says, “I sure hope they seek certification, I for one would be far more likely to purchase one that had been certified over one that had not. It might give a manufacturer an edge over a competitor.” It certainly will. I can’t imagine any company not wanting to get certification. If they choose not to, it will make me wonder if they have something to hide. The certification process is still a while away, though. First is their report in October. Then they will start working on a certification process.

Well, that’s all I have for this week. Gotta go and write a post for tomorrow, then pack up my stuff for the pet event this Sunday. I hope you all have a great weekend. Thanks for stopping by. 🙂

Dawn with Maya & Pierson

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