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Archive for October, 2016

October 21, 2016

Dog in Travel Carrier

We’re always recommending safety tips and products for pets and when it comes to extended trips, like driving cross-country or through different states, but there’s more to hitting the road when it comes to traveling with a well-restrained animal. Before you go on your adventure, check out some of these tips when it comes to traveling with your four-legged friend:

Getting Certified

According to the AVMA (American Veterinary Medical Association), a CVI (Certificate of Veterinary Inspection) is required when importing and exporting animals across state lines. But in most cases, companion animals and pets are not included when it comes to certification requirements because of these exceptions:

  1. Traveling through the state for a short period of time
  2. Being transferred directly to a specific facility
  3. Taken to a veterinarian’s location
  4. Entering the state for an exhibition, show, tournament or fair

Minimally, some states may require proof of current vaccinations and some forms of health records on an animal, so it might be easier to simply obtain a CVI from your veterinarian if you travel a great deal with your four-legged friend.

Map Your Route

Long road trips always require rest stops along the way, which are really places you can get out of your vehicle, stretch your legs and perhaps use the facilities. While animals are usually welcome at official “rest stops,” look for other pet-friendly locations on the way, like dog parks or restaurants that permit animals in outdoor eating venues.

Car Time

Lengthy time spent in an automobile or other mode of transportation can be uncomfortable for people as well as our cats and dogs. While we all know better than to leave an animal alone in a car, while we’re traveling with them, keep in mind you should:

-Carry plenty of food and water in a spill-proof, sealed container along with clean dishes
-To reduce the risk of them becoming car sick, try and feed them at least an hour before departure times
-If your animal does have a problem with motion sickness, consult with your veterinarian about possible remedies like ginger capsules available at many health food stores
-Make sure your car’s heating and air conditioning are both operating properly and use them while driving according to the outdoor temperature

Be sure you provide shade in the area where your pet will be traveling, even in the winter months, it can be uncomfortable to ride in direct sunlight for extended periods of time.

Two Dogs in the Variocage

Do Your Research

Finally, before arriving at your final destination, make sure to do some research on possible wildlife found in that particular area and whether or not they pose a threat to your pet. Most states have a website that describes the wildlife that’s indigenous to their area, usually found at a fish and game venue. While wildlife usually doesn’t pose too big of a risk for companion animals, it’s always better to be safe and aware rather than uninformed and at risk to exposure.

Enjoy your time on the road with your pet and make the journey as comfortable as possible for everyone involved. There’s no reason we can’t be safe and secure when we’re traveling on the road with our animals.

By Amber Kingsley

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