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Archive for August, 2013

August 31, 2013

Last Saturday, I talked about the reasons why a dog should be restrained in the car. The post mostly focused on the benefits of a pet car harness. But let’s face it, not every dog will wear one. Plus, there are a few legitimate concerns about dog seat belts. So here are some other pet travel products to consider:

Straps for Pet Carriers

This Pet Travel Carrier secured in the car with kennel straps.

Pet Carrier
Have your pet ride in a pet carrier. Make sure the carrier is secured in the vehicle so that if the car goes out of control, the dog crate stays in place. You don’t want it and your dog to be thrown about. Whether a secured travel crate is as safe as a pet car harness is not known. Not much testing has been done on pet travel carriers. However, I imagine that a secured crate is probably just as safe (strictly an opinion). Traveling in this way covers all the reasons discussed last week about why it is better to have your dog secured in the car.

Maya Behind Outward Hound Pet Car Barrier

This is a cloth barrier. A pet car barrier can also be metal or a pet net barrier.

Dog Car Barrier
A dog car barrier can help keep your dog in the back seat and from being a distraction. Depending on the barrier, it may keep your dog from being ejected out the front windshield. However, it can’t keep your dog on the seat and it can’t keep him inside the vehicle if someone opens the door, a window breaks and he jumps out, or he hangs his head out the window and jumps or is thrown out.

Maya Showing Off Her Favorite Pet Travel Products

Maya has more room to stretch out on those long road trips.

Backseat Bridge
I can’t tell you how much I really love the Kurgo Backseat Bridge. I have two big dogs and there is no way Maya can stay comfortably on the back seat, even with her pet car harness on. The seat is too narrow and Maya is too big. And she is too energetic to sit still. So covering the floor of the car helps keep her from being thrown onto the floor. If you’ve read some of the news about how dogs should stay on the seat when wearing their dog seat belts, you can see how difficult it would be to restrain a dog to such an extent that he wouldn’t get thrown forward or onto the floor. The Backseat Bridge can help because it covers the floor. The Backseat Bridge also has a barrier that covers the center console area. If your dog is not buckled in, at least the bridge can keep him from getting thrown onto the floor and possibly keep him in the back seat so that he is not a distraction. A dog car hammock has the same benefits as the Kurgo Backseat Bridge.

Dog Pierson K9 Car Fance

Pierson is testing the K9 CarFence.

K9 CarFence
This is a brand new product. There hasn’t been much testing on it yet. But it sure looks promising. The K9 CarFence keeps your dog from being a distraction and it helps to keep him in his seat.

Pierson Breeze Guard Car Window Screens

Pierson is looking out the window fitted with the Breeze Guard car window screens.

Breeze Guard Car Window Screens
This is another product I really love. I used to let my dogs put their heads out the window. After all, they really love it. But one time, Sephi yelped. I think she got hit in the face with something, probably a small pebble. Thankfully, it didn’t hit her in the eye or nose. She wasn’t injured. But it made me think that perhaps letting her have her head out the window wasn’t such a good idea. Also, a friend of mine on Facebook told me about how a friend of hers had her dog thrown out the car window. He was hanging out having a good time when they suddenly had to swerve their car. Their poor dog flew out and ended up getting run over by the rear tire. And, one final story, I had a dog years ago that actually jumped out the car window. Luckily, we were driving slowly down an old dirt road when Huckleberry saw some cows and jumped out to get at them. He was okay. It shocked us both. But all these incidents will never happen again because of my Breeze Guard car window screens. BTW, despite having screens on my windows to allow the breeze in, I never ever leave my dogs unattended in the car.

If you’re concerned about the safety of your pet but aren’t sure about the safety of pet travel products, there are a lot of alternatives to consider. A pet car harness and pet carrier have a lot more safety benefits, but every dog and every situation is different. Consider your various options and feel free to contact us with any questions or concerns.

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Follow Up Friday #9

Author: MayaAndPierson
August 30, 2013

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Time for another Follow Up Friday hosted by HeartLikeADog and Flea with DogTreatWeb! We had a lot of great comments this week. 🙂

ALLSAFE
Jodi with HeartLikeADog pointed me in the direction of a review of a dog seat belt approved for pet car safety in Germany. The seat belt brand is AllSafe. A friend of mine in the UK actually pointed it out to me a couple months ago. I like the v-neck design and they appear to be very comfortable. The website claims to have tested them and they even show a crash test video.

The video and their testing claims looks a lot like the videos and testing claims as our US brands, so I have put aside any final decisions until the Center for Pet Safety releases an updated report on their testing of various dog seat belt brands.

CENTER FOR PET SAFETY
The Center for Pet Safety is a nonprofit organization, so I will be more inclined to trust their test results rather than I will the test results claimed by individual manufacturers. The report is supposed to be released this fall. Hopefully, this time they will be able to disclose the brands (they did not disclose the four brands tested in the 2011 report).

I will keep you posted. I am confident of the brands we have. But if a brand I sell does not do as well as others, I still contend that something is better than nothing. However, we will notate the results on our retail website and phase in the best brands possible.

HIKING SAFETY
Donna with DonnaAndTheDogs commented on the hiking with your dog post last Saturday. She agreed that knowing your dog was important, especially concerning their recall. She also reminded me of safety protection against two-legged predators. Good point! I forget about the unsavory folk because I’ve always had big dogs and they always seem to be a good deterrent. However, I have to remember that Maya loves everybody. She’d probably greet Jason and Freddie like a BFF.

OTHER PET CAR SAFETY METHODS
Kimberly with KeepTheTailWagging.com mentioned she is getting something to keep her dogs in the back seat, to keep them off the floor, and to keep them from putting their heads out the window. This is great! 🙂 A dog seat belt is not for every dog. And if you have a large dog or more than one dog, putting them in a pet travel crate in a small car is not always feasible. So whatever you can do to help your best friend is simply pawsome! I think this Saturday’s theme for Pet Safety Saturday will be about alternatives to dog car harnesses.

BREEZE GUARD WINDOW SCREENS
I replied to Kimberly’s comment about how the products she mentioned resembles the Backseat Bridge and the Breeze Guard window screens that we have. Jodi with HeartLikeADog remembered my recent post about the Backseat Bridge but wanted to know more about the Breeze Guard window screens. The Breeze Guard window screens are a great product made right here in the USA by an entrepreneur like me. Well, not quite like me. I sell what others have made while Sue actually invented and patented her window screens! Click the image below of Maya looking out of her Breeze Guard window screens and find out more information.

Maya Breeze Guard Window Screens

Maya can get a breeze but she can’t put her head out the car window.

MAYA’S BIRTHDAY
OzTheTerrier, Flea with DogTreatWeb, and Snoopy all liked the Wordless Wednesday post about Maya’s birthday. Oz loved the video of Maya playing. Snoopy clearly agrees with Maya’s philosophy about work. And Flea’s comment made me smile:

“Maya is just ADORABLE. Well. Since it’s Maya’s birthday, we won’t talk about Pierson. ;)”

As you may know, Flea has two adorable Aussie mixes, Flash and Patches. She has an extra fondness for the breed which makes Pierson her favorite (shhh, don’t tell Maya).

Maya and New Purple Collar

SAFEST PLACE IN THE CAR?
Snoopy also asked a good question:

“What do you think is safer, being in the trunk or where I currently sit? Which is on the floor behind the driver seat (I didn’t like it on the seat), I’m strapped in with my harness and attached to the seatbelt. I used to sit in the trunk but Dad thought it isn’t safe if someone rear ends us.”

By trunk, do you mean the area in the back of a hatchback or SUV? I don’t think there have been any studies about whether the floor of the car or the cargo area can be a safe place to ride. It probably depends on the kind of car accident you are in. You’re right about the cargo area possibly not being safe in a rear end collision. But what if you’re on the floor and in a front impact collision? Will the front passenger seats get pushed back and squish you? There are so many factors that I honestly can’t tell you which place is the safest. But I do believe that the fact you are wearing a dog seat belt improves your safety no matter where you ride.

Snoopy says he always wears a dog seat belt and he is never allowed to put his head out the window. Yay, Snoopy! 🙂 Your Monday Mischief posts always make me laugh so I can only imagine what kind of mischief you’d be getting into if you weren’t using a safety restraint in the car. Good job!

THANK YOU!
Thank you, everyone, for all your great comments. And thank you for stopping by! 🙂 As always, please feel free to comment and ask questions.

 

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August 28, 2013

My lovable happy Labrador Maya turned six this month! If you don’t know Maya, she is our Pet Auto Safety CEC (Chief Executive Cuteness). You may have seen her in some of our product photos and reviews on both this blog and our retail website, Pet Auto Safety.com. Read more about her and see many more photos of her on my personal dog blog, AmericanDogBlog.Wordpress.com. In the meantime, here are a few recent photos of Maya hard at work:

Lazy Dog MayaMaya Sleeping Under DeskInvincibles Gecko Dog Toy and MayaDog Maya CEC Working Too Hard

Here is Maya from this morning. Still a puppy!


Find more videos like this on DoodleKisses.com

Also, if you have a chance, go vote for Maya’s photo in a calendar contest on HeartLikeADog. Visit and vote daily! It would be a great birthday present. 😉

For more great pet photos, check out the Wordless Wednesday blog hop below:;)

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Pierson Blue Go-Tech Dog Car Harness

Our Pet Auto Safety pup Pierson demonstrates the Kurgo Go-Tech car harness.

Many pet seat belts are now safety and crash tested. But even if you have one that isn’t, there are still several reasons why wearing a dog safety belt is better than wearing nothing at all.

Distraction – Some dogs, like my Maya, can be a major distraction in the car. If Maya wasn’t wearing her dog safety belt, she’d be jumping back and forth from the front to back seat, putting her nose in my face, and trying to put her head in my lap. Not all dogs are as crazy as my Maya. Some are even well-behaved in the car, like my Pierson. So here are some other reasons why pet seat belts are a good idea.

Keep on the Seat – If you have to make a sudden stop, your dog won’t get thrown onto the floor or into the dash. Getting thrown forward could mean a broken limb or injured nose. In some cases, it could even mean death. This is just for a sudden stop. What about a rear-end collision or a more severe car collision?

Dog Head Out Window Danger

I don’t think the car is moving in this photo. But see that gap under the dog’s neck where the window curves down? If this car was moving and had to stop suddenly, the dog could get his neck caught in that crack and do some serious damage to his throat. It could even kill him, depending on how fast the car was going.

Keep Head Inside the Car – As much as our dog loves to put his head out the window, it isn’t safe. If you have to make a sudden stop, your dog could be choked. Or if you have to make a sharp turn, your dog could get thrown out of the car. Also, flying debris on the road can hit your dog in the eye or in the nose – very painful.

Keep Dog Inside the Car – If your dog sees something that he wants to chase or go after, he might jump out the window. Maybe he won’t do it if the car is not moving (maybe), but what about at a stop light? Remember the movie Marley and Me? It does happen! Also, what about when you pull up to the park? When you open the door, you don’t want your dog to rush out in excitement. If he is buckled up, you can switch from his car harness tether to his leash in moments. Your dog won’t have a chance to rush out and possibly get himself in danger by blindly running into the street or jumping on some unsuspecting passerby.

Car Accident – If your dog is wearing a dog safety belt, he won’t get ejected from the vehicle. Being ejected means he could be more seriously hurt or killed instantly. It also means that if he is able to run away from the scene of the accident, he will most likely try to do so. If your dog isn’t ejected, the terror caused by being in a car collision may make your dog want to escape. If he gets out of the car, he could run into the street and get hit by a car, he could cause another car accident, or he could run off, get lost, and lose out on some necessary medical treatment.

We realize there is a lot of concern about the safety of pet seat belts. There are many manufacturers out there claiming to be the best. They even have safety test results and crash test videos to back it up. But as of yet, there are no established universal pet safety standards. Until then, be assured that most of the brands that have claimed testing have put their heart and souls into their products and truly believe in their safety. Also, consider that something has got to be better than nothing at all. You can also consider the alternative of having your dog ride in a pet travel carrier. Just make sure the crate is secured in the car, i.e. it can’t slide around.

Straps for Pet Carriers

This pet travel carrier is secured in the car with kennel straps.

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Follow Up Friday #8

Author: MayaAndPierson
August 23, 2013
My Dog Pierson Eating Sonic Ice Cream

I walked with Pierson to pick up my car from the auto shop and we stopped at Sonic on the way back. Did you know they give out a free sample for your dog?

Time for another edition of Follow Up Friday hosted by HeartLikeADog and SandSpringChesapeakes. Follow Up Friday is where we follow up with the events of the week. So check out what you missed, then go see what our doggy blogging friends are up to with the blog hop below.

Pet Safety Saturday – Outdoor Hiking Safety

I can’t believe I completely forgot to include first aid supplies in my list! Thankfully, all the bloggers talking about first aid this month reminded me and I added it on as an update. Jodi with HeartLikeADog.com suggested other items you should brink hiking – “a flashlight as well as an extra collar and leash.” And she also suggested a pepper blaster. I live in Kansas where the predators are not very big. So it never occurred to me to bring pepper spray. But it sounds like a fantastic idea.

Monday – My Car and Pierson’s Poem

It took forever, but I finally got my car back. I almost had it back last Friday but it died on me as I pulled into my driveway. I couldn’t restart it so had it towed to a repair shop. It was about 3pm so, of course, they didn’t have time to look at it that day. And they were closed on the weekend. They finally had a chance to look at it on Monday and guess what? The car started for them! They even drove it around. They couldn’t find anything wrong with it at all. 😛

My car is home now and seems to be doing fine. It’s almost as good as new. Just look at that shiny new bumper! We’re ready to roll for the next pet event. 🙂

Bumper on Car Fixed

Look at my shiny new bumper!

My Car Bumper Fixed

See how pretty it is?

Also, Pierson’s poo poem was selected as one of the winners for the Bad Poetry Day Contest. If you haven’t seen the poem, go check it out on our other blog. The poem is titled, Roses Aren’t Edible, and is a blogging sensation – 30 comments!!! Apparently you all like poo too. 😉

Pet Travel Destination Tuesday

No comments for the post on Seattle, Washington. But I forgot to mention one made by Lindsay with ThatMutt.com from the previous Tuesday. She says, “Our favorite pet friendly travel destination has always been the north shore area of Lake Superior in Minnesota. We can always find dog friendly trails and cabins or hotels. Plus, lots of places for dogs to go swimming.” This sounds like a lot of fun! Tell us more, Lindsay.

Because I own my own business, I pretty much work it seven days a week and our family seldom gets to do much traveling. So, Lindsay and anyone else who’d like to talk about their favorite pet travel destination, feel free to email me with more information and photos for a guest spot.

Question of the Week

How can I keep my dog from wiggling out of the dog car harness?

This is such a common occurrence that we include a tip sheet with all our pet seat belt orders. The fact is if a dog is not used to wearing a harness and hates to be restricted in the car, he is going to try to wiggle his way out of it. And a very determined dog might just be able to do so. How can you keep him from getting out of it? Not by tightening it. In fact, this may make your dog even more determined to get out of it because it makes him uncomfortable. And if it is too tight, he could hurt himself when he tries to wiggle free.

Is there a brand that is escape-proof? Not that we have found so far, though some are more difficult than others. If anyone ever makes the claim that theirs is escape-proof, I can almost guarantee that some dog somewhere will prove them wrong. For one, consider the design of a dog car harness. With safety in mind, the neck of a pet seat belt has to be wide in order to prevent choking. This means it can’t be snug around the neck like a collar.

So what can you do? Our tip sheet suggests training. If you use a Halti or Gentle Leader on your dog for walking, then you probably already have an idea of what to do to get your dog used to wearing a dog car harness. Check out an article we wrote on HubPages for more extensive training tips.

That’s all for today. Thank you so much everyone for stopping by. If you have any questions on pet travel or on any of our products, just comment below or email me at naturebydawn@aol.com. Also, feel free to share information on photos on your favorite pet travel destination.

Dawn with Maya & Pierson

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August 20, 2013

Artistic View of Seattle Washington

Despite having lived in Oregon, I have amazingly never made it to Washington. And I’ve heard Seattle is super pet friendly so I thought I would do a little research. Here is what I found.

There is no lack of pet friendly accommodations in Seattle. Hotels and vacation home rentals are abundant. Multiple modes of transportation are also available for you and your dog. Check out all these options: city buses, the Seattle Ferry Service, Dog Gone Taxi, Argoys Cruises (water taxi service only), and Emerald Country Carriages. In fact, most of the ferry services are dog friendly. While browsing online, I think I even saw a seaplane tour that allowed dogs!

If you love gardens, Seattle has some astonishingly beautiful places to visit. And many will welcome your best friend. There is the Carl English Jr Botanical Gardens, Woodland Park Rose Garden, and Kubota Garden.

Check out this dog enjoying his visit at the Kubota Garden:

There are also a ton of off-leash dog parks, stores, and restaurants in Seattle. Even many of the farmer’s markets welcome dogs. And don’t forget the many parks in Seattle. A few fun parks to visit include Discovery Park, Blake Island State Park, and Green Lake Park. There is also the Sand Point Magnuson Park which also has a wonderful off-leash dog park where your dog can go swimming.

For a more extensive list of things you can do with your dog in Seattle, Washington, visit DogFriendly.com. Also, check out a blog article about Seattle from GoPetFriendly.com where they recommend a number of places, including Norm’s Eatery and Ale House as a dog friendly restaurant.

Do you live in or have you been to Seattle, Washington? Tell us what you do with your dog when you’re there. Have photos you want to share? Email us at naturebydawn@aol.com.

Also, if you’d like to be featured in an article about your favorite pet travel destination, let us know.

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August 17, 2013
Kurgo Wander Back Pack for Dogs

Maya sometimes wears her Kurgo Wander back pack for dogs when she goes hiking.

I don’t know about you, but I tend to be relatively inactive in the summer because it is so darned hot. I still take the dogs out for walks in the morning or evenings, but nature hikes are no fun in the summer. So now that the weather is getting cooler, I’m excited about taking the dogs on an outdoor hiking expedition again.

Here are some outdoor hiking safety factors I think about for Maya and Pierson:

Leashes or Harnesses

I admit, I don’t always keep Maya on a leash when we hike. Maya is very good at staying by my side and has a very good recall. Pierson, on the other hand, has never been off leash except in our backyard. So I don’t trust him to come when he is called if he sees an animal to chase. Know your dogs. If you are not sure if they will come to you in various scenarios, then keep them on a leash. Also, be considerate to other people when hiking in areas frequented by others. Some people don’t like dogs and are even afraid of them. Furthermore, some hiking trails are also frequented by bicyclists or people riding horses. Loose dogs do not always get along well with bicycles and horses.

Dog Tags

Maya and Pierson always wear their collar and tags. Plus, they are both microchipped. Even though I am confident in Maya’s recall and that I have a good grip on Pierson’s leash, the unexpected could happen. What if there is a loud noise that scares them? It might catch me unawares and make me lose my grip on their leash when they bolt. It’s unlikely but if the worst does happen, at least you have a better chance of being reunited with your best friend.

Wild Animals

Beware of wild animals. Small animals like rabbits and squirrels can be very tempting for your dog to chase. Your dog getting lost because he chased an animal is not the only concern. There are many harmful wild animals to watch out for such as alligators (BrownDogCBR has to look out for these), porcupines, poisonous snakes, skunks, raccoons, etc. By the way, another good reason to keep your dog on a leash is so that they don’t eat wild animal feces. Raccoon poop, for one, can be infected with worms or even canine distemper.

Plants & Biting Insects Harmful to Dogs

Some plants can be harmful for your dog too. Look out for poison ivy and poison oak. Also beware of thorned plants. Biting insects are what bothers me the most on our outdoor hiking adventures. Ticks here are really bad. We also need to be aware of mosquitos and fleas. My dogs use Frontline, but this only kills fleas and ticks when they get on the dog. It doesn’t prevent the little blood-suckers from getting on them in the first place. As a repellant, I am considering a new product from Earth Heart called Buzz Guard. Earth Heart is the same company that makes the Travel Calm that I use for Maya when she rides in the car.

Pet Water Safety – To Swim

If you are hiking near water and plan on letting your dog swim, consider a dog life jacket. Also, know the dangerous aquatic wild animals native to your area such as water moccasin snakes or alligators.

Maya and her dog life jacket.

Maya at Clinton Lake wearing her dog life jacket.

Pet Water Safety – To Drink

Water safety also includes making sure both you and your dog have plenty of fresh cool water to drink. If you can help it, don’t let your dog drink from the lake or river water. It can contain bacteria and parasites that will make your dog sick. I like using the Kurgo collapsible dog water bowl when I go hiking with the dogs. We also won the Frosty Paws travel pack sometime back and it has a fantastic dog water bottle.

Dog Pierson Collapsible Dog Bowl

My dog Pierson is drinking from the Kurgo collapsible dog bowl.

Dog Travel Safety

Don’t forget to travel to your hiking destination in safety. Seat belts for dogs, pet travel carriers, or our new K9 Car Fence, are just a few of the options available to ensure your best friend is kept just as safe as every other member of your family.

Conclusion

I like to take Maya and Pierson to Clinton Lake. The Mutt Run off-leash dog park is nearby and even has a place for Maya to swim. And there are a lot of secluded trails around the lake for me to take my dog-aggressive fluffhead Pierson.

Maya Meets Dog Swimming @ Dog Park

This is one of the rivers that feed into Clinton Lake. This particular area is part of the Mutt Run off-leash dog park.

 

I hope I covered everything. Can you think of any other outdoor hiking safety tips? Where do you like to take your dog hiking?

 

Update – First Aid Kit

After reading another blog post on first aid supplies, I realized I didn’t have a first aid kit on my list. Shame, shame! It is a good idea to have one with supplies for both you and your pet when you go hiking. A complete list of ideal first aid supplies can be found on KeepTheTailWagging.com. Thanks Kimberly, for your great post and reminder. 🙂

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Follow Up Friday #7

Author: MayaAndPierson
August 16, 2013

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There weren’t as many questions this week so I’m going to talk about other stuff that has happened on my other blog, AmericanDogBlog.Wordpress.com, and things happening for us on other dog websites.

My Dog Pierson is to be on a Calendar!

I’m so happy that my dog Pierson is to be featured in the That Mutt calendar! Thank you to everyone who saw my post on Facebook and voted. 🙂

That Mutt Talks about Pet Auto Safety

Lindsay with That Mutt also talked about pet auto safety on one of her blog posts. Go check it out – Do Dogs Need Seat Belts? The article is well thought out and covers pros and cons. Feel free to comment. 🙂

Dogs Trapped in Cars After Accidents?

One of the questions Lindsay asked me prior to her post threw me off. She said she knew some people who were concerned about a pet car harness or pet travel carrier causing a dog to get trapped in the vehicle in a car accident. Can you believe that in all my years of running this business, no one has ever brought this up before?

Certainly, it can happen. I think this was a concern when seat belts for people first came out. But after years and years of research, statistics have shown that this risk is small and the likelihood of a seat belt saving a life is much greater.

If anything, I would be concerned about an unrestrained dog escaping from the vehicle after an accident. I get Google alerts for dogs in car accidents on a regular basis and so see a lot of news stories about dogs that went missing because they escaped the vehicle and ran off in terror. Think about it, after a car accident your dog is likely to be completely freaked out. His instinct is going to be to get as far away from the terrifying situation as quickly as possible. When a dog runs in terror, he runs blindly. This means he could run into the street, cause another car accident, and possibly get struck and killed by another vehicle.

Here’s a story with a happy ending. The video automatically plays, so I’m sorry about that. I don’t know how to keep it from doing that.

I understand we all have our different fears. The thing about a car accident is that it is unpredictable. You never know when you will be in a collision, let alone what kind of collision. What may be perfect for one situation may not be for another. Just consider the odds. While the above situation happens all the time, heroes like this aren’t always around to help.

SleepyPod’s New ClickIt Pet Car Harness

Sleepypod is coming out with the new ClickIt pet car harness soon and this design is also based on recommendations from the Center for Pet Safety! They are going to be expensive, but worth it. Keep posted here on this blog and I will let you know as soon as they are available.

My Interview with the Radio Pet Lady

I had an interview about pet auto safety on the Radio Pet Lady Dog Travel Experts show. Paris with Dog Tipper was there too! The show aired last night but will be archived at this link soon. Be sure to check it out. I think Gizmo with Terrier Torrent will be interviewed next week to talk about the fun of geocaching.

Bad Poetry Day

Hop on over to the AmericanDogBlog.Wordpress.com for Pierson’s Bad Poetry Day contest entry. Seriously, it will make you laugh! 😀 Maya will feature her bad poetry tomorrow.

Where is the Pet Auto Safety Car?

As you may have read, Maya and I were in a rear end collision on July 25th. It was bad enough that the insurance company considered my car as totaled, but not bad enough to cause serious injury. Even though the car is considered totaled, I am working with the repair shop to still have it fixed. Hopefully, they can get used parts instead of new and be able to fix it for the check amount the insurance company gave me. But as of today, I still don’t have my car back!!!

How is it that a car can be considered totaled for just a fender bender? First of all, it is a Ford. That should be enough explanation, but in case you’re wanting more… My car is a 1998. Why in the heck would I want to keep such an old car? Believe it or not, it only has 87,000 miles on it and it is still running well. Also, it was more than just the bumper that was damaged. It turns out the frame is bent too, and other stuff.

K9 Car Fence

A lot of you commented on what a great idea the K9 Car Fence is. Pierson didn’t think so, but I thought it was brilliant too! I wish I had thought of it. 😉

Dog Pierson K9 Car Fance

Pierson is testing the K9 Car Fence.

Questions or Comments?

As always, if you have any questions about pet travel, feel free to ask them by commenting below or by emailing me at naturebydawn@aol.com. I’d love to hear from you!

Join the Blog Hop

Thank you for stopping by and reading my long-winded post today! Follow Up Friday is hosted by Heart Like a Dog and co-hosted by Flea with JonesNaturalChews so be sure to go check them out. Other dog blogs participating in Follow Up Friday can be found in the blog hop links below.

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August 14, 2013

Happy to be a special friend to Dog Travel Experts on Radio Pet Lady Network

Listen to the Dog Travel Experts radio show with the Radio Pet Lady tonight at 8pm ET where Paris with DogTipper.com asks me some basic questions on pet auto safety. Visit their website – http://www.radiopetlady.com/dog-travel-experts.htm or click the link at the Pet Radio link below to listen live. If you miss it, I will provide a link to the archived radio show on my Follow Up Friday post.

 

Listen in for great pet topics:

Click to open RPLN player window, then click play button to listen.

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Perkasie Covered Bridge

Perkasie Covered Bridge

This post is for all of you who love your pets and are captivated by Colonial America. Bethlehem, Pennsylvania has a number of early history sites that you can visit without having to leave your dog all alone in the hotel room.

Even if you did have to leave your dog at the hotel, he’d really have it made at Hotel Bethlehem! This hotel has a number of fantastic pet services. And best of all, the size of your pet is not an issue (unless it is a horse, of course). While you go out and see the sites that are not pet friendly, your best friend can lounge on the plush hotel pet beds. He can get delicious biscuits from Bone Appetit. Pet services include pet sitting and walking services.

Oops, that hotel is so nice I almost forgot about the dog friendly Colonial America sites you can see! Visit the Burnside Plantation and check out a colonial farm. Walk a historical colonial town in the Colonial Industrial Quarter. And take the Dutch Hex Tour to see some barn art. You’ll have to read more about these sites on DogFriendly.com.

Want to see some gorgeous Pennsylvanian scenery? About an hour north is the Lehigh Gorge State Park. See what Buster with GoPetFriendly.com has to say about his visit there. A closer destination (about 30 minutes north) is the Nockamixon State Park. Bucks County is just an hour south of Bethlehem and there are a lot of scenic sights there.

Check out the New Hope Towpath trail and find a lot of pet friendly restaurants along the way. The above photo of the historical bridge is in Perkasie, Pennsylvania in Lanape park. Near the park is also a dog park.

Be sure that while you are driving around and visiting all these great historical and nature sites that your dog is secured in the car. Wear a dog car harness or ride in a secured pet travel carrier. As always, be safe and have fun! 🙂

* Would you like to share your favorite pet travel destination? Email us at naturebydawn@aol.com. Share your experience, share photos, and we will post about it on our blog with a link to your own website or blog.

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