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Pet-Friendly Hotel Chains on the Road

Author: MayaAndPierson
September 15, 2016

Not all pet-friendly hotels are created equal since pet policies and fees will vary. For example, some hotels may only allow pets smaller than 25 pounds, while others may only accept dogs.

With so many hotel chains on the road, you may be thinking about hitting the open road with your four-legged friends. To help make your planning easier, here are some popular hotel chains that are more than welcoming to pets.

Motel 6 August 2014 Maya & Pierson

Motel 6 has been Maya & Pierson’s #1 hotel choice ever since we got stuck in an ice storm in Oklahoma during the 2013 holiday season.

#1 Motel 6

This budget minded hotel chain was one of the first chains to allow pets. Conveniently located along all major highways, Motel 6 is a favorite among travelers looking for a stay along their travel route. All Motel 6 properties allow service animals and well-behaved pets (unless they pose a safety risk or are prohibited by law). And the best part is that they stay for free.

#2 Red Roof Inn

This hotel chain does a great job of welcoming your four-legged friend; in fact, they even have a Facebook page dedicated to them called “Red Roof Luvs Pets.” All of Red Roof Inns 345 locations are pet-friendly and all of them allow pets to stay for free. Their motto is, “You Stay Happy, Pets Stay Free!” (note from blog owner: Perhaps Red Roof has changed their policy because we have been charged pet fees at some locations.)

#3 La Quinta

Well behaved pets are welcomed at all but 4 of their 800+ La Quinta locations. La Quinta is known for offering quality service and providing its guests with many of the features and amenities offered at high-end hotels. Most importantly, La Quinta does not charge pet fees. When booking online, be sure to mention that you are traveling with your pet in the “Special Requests” section. If calling to book, be sure to let the reservation agent know.

#4 Kimpton Hotels

Kimpton Hotels are a super pet-friendly boutique hotel chain that raises the bar when it comes to being pet-friendly. As part of their program, hosPETality, in addition to pets staying free, any number of pets are welcome regardless of size, weight, kind, or breed. Each Kimpton Hotel offers its unique pet-friendly services and amenities. Be sure to check them out if you are looking for some serious pet pampering.

#5 Indigo Hotels

Many of the Indigo Hotels will call you before your arrival to see if they can enhance your stay beyond your expectations. On arrival, you will receive a dog goody basket. Hotel Indigo in Downtown Asheville, for example, even offers custom dog treats with your pet’s name on.

They will also provide you with bowls, beds, toys and complimentary scoop bags. One unique feature of their pet-friendly program are their canine cocktail parties, known as Yappy Hour. During this hour, guests, their four-legged friend, and locals mingle over cocktails and snacks. The best part is that some of the money raised goes to the local animal shelter.

Indigo Hotels do have some weight restrictions in place, which differ between the individual hotels, and they also charge a one-time fee that ranges between $40 to $75.

#6 Loews Hotels

On arrival, you will receive a welcome package that includes treats, a golden pet tag, bowls, scoop bags and vouchers for local pet-friendly establishments. In your room, you will find comforts such as beds, litter trays, scratching posts, rawhide bones and even pet DVDs. They also offer pet services, such as pet-sitting and pet-walking.

Loews Hotels endeavor to wait on your paw and foot, and they have room service menus that have been especially created for pets by their award-winning chef. If your pet is the adventurous type, then you can head over to Loews Hotel, San Diego, where they hold dog surfing competitions. If your dog would rather spend the day being pampered, then consider visiting the Loews Hotels in St Pete Beach, where they offer a professional canine therapeutic service.

All pets are welcome, and they have a one-time fee, which is between $25 to $35.

When staying at any of these pet-friendly hotels, you must always register your pet upon check-in. Also, it’s important to abide by the house rules and follow proper pet etiquette to ensure that you and your dog, cat, or another furry friend is welcomed back.

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Pet Travel Infographic

Author: MayaAndPierson
June 8, 2016

Below is a great pet travel infographic made by Amber Kingsley. It should be briefly noted that the information on pet crates may be misleading. For one, the best crash tested crates do not always have handles. Nor are they necessary since it would be difficult to lift a heavy-duty crate and a large dog anyway. Also, having your dog ride in a pet crate is better than letting them roam loose in the car, but most crates are not crash tested. In fact, a third party did testing on the typical plastic crates and found they would not hold up in a car accident. So if you’re wanting a crash tested crate, consider the German engineered Variocage pet travel cage. It has been crash tested in multiple crash test scenarios and meets or beats many European standards for safety.

Pet Travel Tips Infographic

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10 Travel Tips When Riding With Rover

Author: MayaAndPierson
June 2, 2016

Maya Labrador Wearing Allsafe Dog Car Seat Belt

By Amber Kingsley

When driving with our dog, usually an image of them with their head out the window, their tongues and ears flapping in the breeze, but this is the most dangerous place for your dog. As any parent of a human child knows, the safest place for smaller riders is in the back seat.

A dog with their head out a window is at risk of falling out of the vehicle, being struck by debris, getting an ear or lung infection, but the biggest threat comes from the car’s airbag. Since they’re designed for full grown adults, not children and canines, a blow from one of these can cause serious injury or even death to a dog.

Don't Let Your Dog Put Head Out Window

If I were actually driving with my dog Maya having her head out the window, she could be hurt by flying debris or choked if I stop suddenly.

Here’s ten other tips to remember when we’re riding with our best friend:

#1 – Stopping in The Summer: Beware of black asphalt and sidewalks in the searing summer heat. They can easily burn a dog’s sensitive paws, so “pause” and feel the surface with your bare hand before you let Fido out of the car.

#2 – Bring Water: Always bring water along for the ride, even on short distances. Be sure to watch for signs of dehydration in your pet

#3 – Consider a Crate: An enclosure for your pet is also the safest way for them to travel. Many people don’t realize that flying objects in a car can cause injury or death in the event of an accident.

#4 – Buckle Up: If you don’t want to use a crate, then be sure to buckle up your pet by attaching their harness to seat belt or other device. If you are unfortunate enough to be involved in an accident, an unrestrained animal can escape through a broken window putting them in danger.

Dog Pierson on Pet Travel Flat Seat in Car 2

#5 – Don’t Leave Them Alone: We all know the dangers of keeping a dog in a car that’s either too hot or too cold, but your precious pooch could also be stolen.

#6 – Plan Ahead: If you’re going on a long journey, check your route for some pet-friendly destinations to stop along the way. And not just dog parks, a growing number of hotels and restaurants allow dogs.

#7 – Keep Them Busy: Bring along some of their favorite toys and treats. Just like children, bored animals can be very distracting when you’re trying to drive.

#8 – Stop Regularly: Just like the driver and other passengers, especially on long journeys, you’ll want to stop, get out and stretch your legs. You dog might want to relieve themselves, and they obviously can’t say, “I have to go to the bathroom.”

#9 – Keep An Eye On Them: While most dogs who are traveling safely either in a crate or buckled up in the back seat, usually they’ll just go to sleep. But keep an eye on them for signs they could be getting restless or car sick and pull over if necessary.

#10 – Start Out Slow: Before you take your dog on a cross country trip or other extended holiday, start off with shorter trips and work your way up to several hours with them in the car. They’ll be less stressed and also less likely to become car sick.

We don’t have to leave our pets at home when we go on road trips or vacations, but we do need to keep them safe. With just a little bit of extra planning and these tips, you and your best friend can have the time of your life on the road.

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November 13, 2015

Dog Maya Goofy Grin Kurgo Harness

By: Derek Petersen

It’s that time of year that a lot of people will be traveling to see friends and family. If you’re like me, you take your furry friends on the road with you. Athena (my Siberian Husky) and Boston (my Chocolate Lab) always get so excited when they know it’s time for a ride in the car. Their eyes widen, ears perk up, and their tails start to wag. Little do they know that it’s not for a short trip, but were heading on an 8-hour drive to see the family. I find that waiting until the last minute to say “want to go for a ride,” works in my favor. Little do they know that I’ve been prepping them for this ride the last couple of days.

There are tips on traveling safe with your pet while in the car, but there are variables that you need to think about before putting your pet in the car for a long road trip. Taking these steps to prepare your dog for a long road trip is imperative to their health and wellbeing during your road trip this year.

Here are some easy steps to follow to ensure your dog has a great road trip:

Step #1:

Feed your dog early. Your pet’s travel-feeding schedule should start with a light meal three to four hours prior to departure. It’s important to feed your dog a few hours early to help prevent motion sickness.

2 Shelties in the Variocage Compact XLStep # 2:

Prepare your vehicle for your pet. It’s recommended that you crate your dog for long road trips. If you don’t normally crate your dog, it may be time to rethink that decision. Crating your dog will create less of a distraction while you drive (especially while driving by yourself) which is safer for the both of you. Also, a crate helps to prevent your dog from becoming a projectile if you have to stop urgently, reducing the chance of injury for both of you. A best practice is to exercise your dog before putting them into the crate. A dog that has exercised is more likely to relax in the crate, while dogs who haven’t exercised will have built up anxiety and may not be willing to accept the crate.

Paw Print Pet Organizer Bag / PouchStep #3:

Pack a bag with all of your dog’s goodies: dog food, treats, bottled water, dog leashes, waste bags and dog toys (their favorite toy, of course). This pet friendly travel kit should also contain portable dog bowls, dog documents, and a dog first aid kit. Keep the leashes handy, as you will be making frequent stops.

Step #4:

Now that you have prepared your dog and vehicle for the trip ahead, it’s time to plan the stopping spots. If you’re traveling on major freeways or highways, you can count on having rest areas (that almost always have a “pet section”) to stop and let your dog out. There are times you might need to stop and get food, but no matter where you stop, don’t ever leave your dog in the car. On a hot day, even with the windows open, a parked vehicle can become a furnace in no time, and heatstroke can develop. On a cold day, a vehicle can act as a refrigerator, holding in the cold and causing your dog to possibly freeze to death.

Now we’ve gone through the steps in preparing your dog(s) for a long road trip, and you should be ready for the road ahead. Always continue to learn the best practices in keeping your family, pets, and yourself safe in your vehicle at all times. Buckle up and enjoy your trip!

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Little Dog Driving Car

Kahlua

If you live in Connecticut, then perhaps you have heard that Senator Doyle has proposed a bill to the Connecticut General Assembly that will make it illegal for a driver to allow their dog to ride in their lap (Proposed Bill #518, CT Gen. As.) & (Connecticut Post). Perhaps your dog doesn’t distract you when he rides in your lap, but you may soon have to keep him off your lap if you want to avoid getting a ticket. If you are worried that your dog is so used to riding in your lap that he will get anxiety by not being allowed, we have some tips that might help.

Arnold the Frenchie Wearing the BerganDog Car Harness 2

Arnold in a dog bed and wearing a dog car harness.

BED AND TOYS
If your dog has a bed that he really loves to sleep in, put this bed in the passenger seat or the back seat. Give your dog his favorite toy or treat to chew on. For your dog’s safety, it is probably best not to use toys or treats with sharp edges as this could harm him if you stop or swerve suddenly.

TRAINING & PRACTICE
Find a big empty parking lot where you can drive around safely without danger of hitting pedestrians or other vehicles. Drive around with your dog and reward him for staying calm in his seat. If he won’t stay in his seat, toss a small treat into the seat for him to retrieve, then toss him another one while he is in the seat. You should make sure you are at a full stop before rewarding him or simply have a friend ride with you that can reward your dog.

PET ANXIETY REMEDY
If your dog has anxiety about being separated from you, consider various pet anxiety remedies. The Thundershirt is clothing your dog can wear. This product has great success at helping dogs with anxiety issues. There is also an all-natural herbal remedy called Travel Calm that you can put on your dog. Some dog anxiety treatments also come in pill form. Also, keep in mind that sometimes your dog’s anxiety is a reflection of your anxiety. If you remain calm and don’t make a fuss, this could go a long way to help keep your dog calm.

Roxy in a Pet Car Seat

Roxy in the Skybox Booster Seat

PET TRAVEL PRODUCTS
There are several pet travel products that you can use to keep your dog off your lap. Another benefit of using one of these products is the safety benefit. Certain products not only keep your dog from being a distraction, they also offer a measure of crash-worthy safety.

If your dog likes to see out the window, there are several pet car seats that allow this. These car seat also have a tether in them that you can use to attach to your dog’s harness to keep him in the seat. Do not attach the tether to your dog’s collar since this could choke him if you slam on the brakes. If your dog likes to be by your side, there are pet car seats that attach to your car’s center console. And, if your dog likes his crate at home, you can have him use his crate in the car too. If you feel these products provide too little space for your dog, there are several other pet travel products to choose from in today’s market, such as dog car harnesses or pet nets and barriers.

Dog Pierson K9 Car Fance

Pierson in the K9 Car Fence and wearing a Bergan brand dog car harness

SAFETY CONSIDERATION
Even if your dog doesn’t distract you when you drive, there is another good reason he shouldn’t ride in your lap. Airbags are not safe for dogs. If your airbag deploys, a minor car accident could turn deadly for your dog, and possibly do serious damage to you as well.
Although this law has not been made yet, you can still get a ticket for driving while distracted. Not only that, it just isn’t safe for you or your dog if he rides in your lap. So don’t wait for Connecticut to specifically ban dogs riding in laps to take action. Protect your best pal today. Many of the pet travel products mentioned above can be found by clicking on the Shop button on the top right of this page.

Do you let your dog ride in your lap? Do you know someone who does? Do you have any other pet travel concerns? Let the #DogTravelAdvisor know by emailing us or commenting below.

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February 12, 2015

Maya Go-Tech Dog Seat Belt Journey

Are you about the em’bark’ on a journey with your dog? The #DogTravelAdvisor recommends the following safety items you should bring for your best pal:
* If traveling by car, your dog’s seat belt or pet carrier
* ID tags secured on your dog’s collar)
* Vet information
* Emergency contact information
* Photo of your pet
* Pet first aid kit
* Food and water
* Leash
* Blanket
* Your pet’s medication, including Travel Calm or other car sickness remedies

In addition to the above pet safety essentials, here are some non-essential, but probably-a-good-idea-to-bring-anyway, things:
* Toys
* Treats
* Dog bed
* Food and water bowls
* Dog brush
* Poo bags
* Baby wipes (for other doggie messes)
* Lint brush for dog hair clean-up

One time when we traveled, we forgot our dogs’ food! We left it by the door but forgot to put it in our car. Thankfully, we were able to find their regular brand at a store along the way. Have you ever forgotten to bring something when you traveled with your dog?

 

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January 27, 2015

Pierson Pet Flat Seat Ruff Rider

Preparing For Your Dog’s First Car Ride
By Suni Miller

Traveling with your dog can be a great adventure. Before you start your travel, there are some things you want to keep in mind when traveling in the car with your pet.

Safety

Always remember safety first. Purchasing a dog safety seat will be safer for your dog in case you come to a sudden stop or make a quick turn. Make sure your pet cannot roam around the vehicle freely. There are also pet safety belts that can be purchased. This can ensure that the pet cannot be thrown from the vehicle or into another passenger in case of an accident, sudden stop, or turn. Another option is purchasing a crate. If you ever considered traveling with your pet by plane, then having your pet in a crate is required by the airline. It can also keep your pet out of trouble at a hotel or somebody else’s house. You want to make sure the crate is big enough to allow the dog to stand, turn, and lie down. It should be sturdy with handles and grips. It should also have a leak proof bottom covered with absorbent material. Air should be able to flow through it freely.

Emma in the Snoozer Lookout Pet Carseat

Identification

In case your dog gets away from you during a trip, it is best to make sure he has identification to increase the chances of a recovery. Make sure your pet is wearing a collar at all times, which have identification tags with the dog’s name, your name, a number where you can be reached, and proof of rabies shots. You can consider a more permanent form of identification, such as a microchip. It is also a good idea to have a recent picture of your dog with you.

The Car Ride

Allow your dog to get used to sitting in the car first without leaving the driveway and then start off by going for short rides, so you and your dog can get familiar with traveling by car together. Don’t feed your dog before traveling. This way you can avoid car sickness. Make the first few trips somewhere fun for your dog, like a park or field. This way he will associate riding in the car as something fun and enjoyable as opposed to just trips to the vet. Make sure to have plenty of water at all times especially during the warmer times. Keep the car well ventilated. However, do not let your dog ride with his head sticking out of an open window. This can lead to the potential of an eye injury. Never leave your dog unattended in a closed vehicle, especially during warmer or colder temperatures. If you do have to leave your dog, make sure someone else is in the car with him. When going on long car trips make sure to bring some of your dog’s favorite chew toys and treats, so he will not get bored. Stop often for exercise and potty breaks and be sure to have something to clean up after your dog.

Traveling by car can be a great experience for you and your pet, but to make sure that it is a great experience following these tips will be helpful. Now you’re ready to ride off into the sunset.

Article Source: Preparing For Your Dog’s First Car Ride

 

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September 18, 2014

Barks and Bytes Blog Hop

Welcome to another edition of Barks & Bytes hosted by Jodi with Heart Like a Dog and Linda with 2BrownDawgs.

It’s been a month since our last participation in the Barks & Bytes blog hop so we have a lot to cover. I’ll try very hard to be brief. First off, if you haven’t done so already, say Happy Birthday to my Maya who turned 7 at the end of August!

IMPROVED PET DEK
In a review of the Pet Dek that I made back in July, I mentioned how one of the legs kept coming off but I fixed it with a washer. The manufacturer of the Pet Dek saw my post and wanted to let me know that this issue has been fixed and is no longer a concern. Honest reviews really pay off!

FREE SHIPPING ON FLAT SEAT
The Portable Pet Travel Flat Seat is a comparable product and for the month of September, we are offering free shipping.

Belle-Button the Frenchie Wearing the Bergan Dog Seat Belt 3

Belle is wearing the Bergan dog seat belt as she rests comfortably in her pet bed in the back seat for the road trip.

FRENCHIES REVIEW
On Wednesday, September 10th, we shared the photos of three adorable Frenchies: Arnold, Belle, and Wilbur. Their mom first purchased the Portable Pet Travel Flat Seat from us. And when she found out we were also in Iowa, she explained how difficult it has been for her to find a dog car seat belt that would fit the odd shape of a Frenchie. And so I offered to visit her in person to try some on. The Kurgo Tru-Fit brand fit them nicely, but the Bergan dog seat belt fit even better. So Arnold, Belle, and Wilbur all have one and they wore them on their recent road trip.

My Dog Pierson with a Woman Named Flea

Does Pierson want pets or does he want goodies from Jones Natural Chews? Flea gives him both.

FLEA!
If you haven’t heard of Flea from DogTreatWeb for Jones Natural Chews, then you’re really missing out. Her blog is funny and Flea is such a heartwarming person. We (Maya, Pierson, and I) have been lucky enough to have been able to meet her on two occasions. Once, during the holidays when we made our annual road trip from Kansas to Texas. And the second time just a couple of days ago as she traveled from Oklahoma to Illinois. It was a wonderful visit and Maya and Pierson were extremely spoiled with the Boo Bucket and other treats from Jones Natural Chews.

Maya Labrador AllSafe Dog Car Harness

The AllSafe dog car harness fits Maya perfectly!

ALLSAFE
Remember earlier in the year where I mentioned one of our goals was to acquire the AllSafe dog car harness? Well, we finally got it! As of yesterday, the AllSafe pet seat belt is officially available on PetAutoSafety.com. For now, it has free shipping. This may change later so if you’ve been wanting one, now is the time to get one. Maya has hers already. Keep an eye out on this blog for our review.

VARIOCAGE
The company that provides the AllSafe dog seat belt also has the VarioCage. If you haven’t heard of it before, it is the absolute best car cage on the market. We don’t have this one on our website yet, but it will be available before the end of the month.

LOST DOG COMMENTS
A special thanks to Barbara from K9sOverCoffee and Lindsay with ThatMutt for adding two more means to find a dog lost after a car accident. Post fliers, contact a radio station to see if they will mention the lost pet, and contact shelters and rescue groups every day to see if anyone has brought in the pet. I can’t believe I didn’t think of these. Thank you!!!

PET TRAVEL ARTICLES
And thank you to Patrice for writing these great pet travel articles for us:
Plan a Great Pet Friendly Trip
Finding Pet Friendly Accommodations

Thanks for stopping by, everyone and enjoy the rest of your week! 🙂

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September 16, 2014

My Dogs in Back of SUV

Having your dog wear a dog seat belt in the vehicle is a great way to keep them from distracting the driver. But you also want them to be safe, right? However, if your dog rides in the cargo area of your hatchback or SUV, you need to know that securing them to cargo rings may not be adequate.

The Center for Pet Safety, a nonprofit research facility for pet products, has recently reported that cargo connections may not have the necessary strength to hold your dog. This means the cargo ring can break if your dog is in a car accident, or even if your dog just pulls on it hard enough. Contact the vehicle manufacturer to find out what amount of force those cargo rings can withstand.

When we rented an SUV one year in order to make our annual trip from Kansas to Texas, we looked diligently for an SUV that had metal connections in the cargo area for Maya and Pierson. We did not find any. As a result, we found a way to connect their dog seat belt harnesses to the safety belt housing of the car located under the seat. However, the Center for Pet Safety advises against this as well.

If you need to have your dog ride in the cargo area, you may need to install a more secure connection in the cargo area. You can also opt to have your dog ride in a crate instead. Just be sure the crate can be secured in place.

We will soon have another option for dogs riding in cargo areas. By the end of September, you will see the VarioCage available on our PetAutoSafety.com retail site. The VarioCage is very expensive but it is also extremely durable. It has been extensively crash tested and even real-life situations have shown that the VarioCage remains intact.

Safety for our pets when we travel is very important and vehicle manufacturers are coming to realize this. More and more car commercials show a dog harnessed in the car. So if you have a vehicle with a cargo area and it doesn’t have cargo rings or just has plastic cargo rings, tell the manufacturer that you want this feature. You may not be able to get it this time around, but they will hear you and hopefully install better connections in future models.

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September 9, 2014

Rear End Front End Car Accident

We read a lot of articles about pet travel and have come across more than a few handfuls where a dog involved in a car accident runs away from the scene and is lost for days. We’ve also followed up with many of these articles and have learned the situations where the dog is found. Most of these reunions have elements in common that can help you if your dog escapes from a terrifying situation.

Return to the Scene
Believe it or not, in most cases where a dog runs away after being in a car accident, he is found within less than a mile of the scene. In some cases, he is actually found at or near the area where the wreck took place. If the accident is on a busy roadway, he is probably going to stay some distance back. Look in nearby areas with lots of foliage or other places to hide.

Trauma Makes Dogs Wary
A dog involved in a traumatic situation is very likely to be skittish with strangers, even normally friendly dogs. If you are helping to locate someone’s lost dog, make sure you have their number handy. If the dog moves away from you when you approach, stop approaching them and call for help.

Live Traps
Since traumatized dogs tend to be shy, putting live traps in areas where there have been sightings can help you catch him when you’re not around. A shy dog may also avoid broad daylight. He may hide during the day, and then seek food and water in darker hours. A live trap will help attract the dog and hopefully catch him when people aren’t able to be out searching.

Tell Everyone
Alert nearby neighbors, notify the local animal shelter and animal control, let the police know, and contact local rescue groups for help. Perhaps even call the local news stations. More than any of the others, individuals from dog rescue groups seem to be the people who most often answer the call to help. They can also be a great resource for getting live traps. Contacting local vet clinics is also a good idea for in case someone brings in a dog that needs medical attention.

Social Media Helps
There are a number of Facebook pages dedicated to finding lost pets. Sometimes pages are created by a family attempting to locate their own lost pet. The people who come together to help are amazing. They share posts, thereby spreading the word about a lost pet, they offer personal assistance with looking for the pet, or they may even have other ways to help. If your dog is missing, post it on CraigsList, Facebook, G+, Twitter, community classifieds, and anything else you can think of.

Protect Yourself from Scammers
Because you are posting the information about your dog publicly, there is a chance you will be contacted by scammers claiming to have found your dog but are wanting money before they return him. The most common scam is from people claiming they were traveling when they found your dog and they want money before they make the long drive back. Don’t fall for it. It is a good idea to withhold a very specific trait about your dog when posting public lost ads. Perhaps your dog has a scar somewhere or a specific mark that is not noticeable in photographs. If a person claiming to have your dog is unwilling to verify specific marks, then they probably don’t really have your dog. A person with the heart enough to pick up an abandoned dog is not likely to ask you for money or be difficult about getting the dog back to you. However, if you are convinced that such a person may, in fact, have your dog, insist on meeting them in person and in a public place before giving them money and see if the police will escort you.

Many of these tips can help in other situations, not just a car accident. If you have any additional tips that might help, please comment below.

(This is not an official study. It is merely an observation we’ve made based on online reports. There are probably a number of situations that were not reported and may not fit in these scenarios. If you’ve lost your pet, consider all options and don’t give up.)

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