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Archive for the 'Dog Carriers' Category

September 25, 2010

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(Back view of the Roll-Around Pet Carrier)

The Roll-Around Pet Carrier is an all-purpose dog carrier made by Snoozer.  You can easily tote the Roll-Around Pet Carrier like a suitcase.  The handle extends and it has wheels for easy tug-along.  Or you can carry it like a backpack.  Then secure it in your car as you drive to the airport.  With the smaller pet carrier, it will fit under most airline seats for airline travel.  When you get to your hotel, keep the dog in the Roll-Around Pet Carrier for use as a pet bed.

To secure the Roll-Around Pet Carrier in your car, simply slide the seat belt of the car through the straps in the back as pictured above.  Then snap the seat belt into the seat belt receptacle.  Sudden stops or car accidents will keep your pet in the pet carrier and the pet carrier secured to the seat.  Snoozer says that the buckled in Roll-Around Pet Carrier in the car seat position with all zippers closed has been crash tested at 30 pounds at 30 mph.

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Keeping your dog in a crate while in the car is safer than allowing your dog to have free access. Generally, crates are expensive online because their size and weight dramatically increase the shipping costs. A collapsible soft sided crate may be a good alternative.

The “It’z a Breeze Too” Collapsible Soft Sided Crate is lightweight and can be folded for easy carrying. It is easy to set up and easy to take down. The “It’z a Breeze Too” Collapsible Soft Sided Crate is also durable. It is made from durable coated nylon mesh fabric and has reinforced corners and connection points.

One drawback of a collapsible soft sided crate is that it may not strap into the car as well as a wire or plastic crate can. Kennel straps may make the crate collapse inward if the straps are too tight.

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May 14, 2010

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We have recently added several new crate styles to Pet Auto Safety.com. Instead of a bulky plastic pet travel crate, try a folding wire pet travel crate. The Folding Wire Pet Travel E-Crate is great for dogs of all ages. It folds in seconds to an easy-to-carry suitcase size. While the Folding Wire Pet Travel E-Crate may be a bit heavy for shipping, it is very durable and the quality is well-worth the price.

The Folding Wire Pet Travel E-Crate can be used in the home or for travel. If you are traveling with your dog, your dog can ride in the car with their dog car seat belt while the crate fits nicely into your trunk or back seat without taking up too much space. Or your dog can ride in the crate while traveling. For additional safety during travel in the crate, consider using a Kennel Strap Restraint System to buckle the pet travel crate into your car.

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Lola Driving the Car

Ever wonder what would happen to your dog if you got into a car accident?  Believe it or not, it happens more than you think.  We have a couple of blog posts which link to dogs who survived a car accident and managed to get home only after being lost for several days.  But the only time reports are made about dogs in car accidents are the reports in which a dog miraculously survives.  I suppose it isn’t newsworthy when it is just another dog who died in the car.  But it happens and it is tragic.

So what is the least which could happen if your dog is in a car accident?  The least is that the dog will get tossed about a bit and suffer a frightening experience.  The incident could be so traumatic that your dog may not want to ride in the car again. 

What’s the worst that could happen?  Lots of things.  Your dog could get thrown from the vehicle where it could die or even be hit by another car on the road.  Your dog could fly forward and hit a passenger, killing both the dog and the passenger.  A dog, no matter what size, could become a deadly projectile.  Your dog could get tossed around inside the car and break their legs, ribs, or even their neck.  They could suffer severe internal and/or external injuries.

How can you prevent this?  By having your dog wear a dog safety restraint when they are in the car.  A dog safety restraint can be a dog car seat belt, a pet safety seat, or even a safely secured dog crate.

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The Dreaded Trip to the Vet

Author: FidoIntheCar
September 3, 2009

petautosafety-dogcarrier.jpgMy pet beagle dreads going to the veterinarian’s office more than any other event. In fact, if he were capable of comprehending the apocalypse and its implications for the world, he would still rather it happened than have to go to the vet. Getting him to sit still while his temperature is being taken is practically impossible, but at least the vet and her assistants take care of that.

I’m the unlucky individual charged with getting him in the car in the first place. At least the task has become much less arduous since my friend recommended dog carriers. I find ways of tricking the dog into the carrier and getting the process over with as soon as possible. Afterward, I reward him with a few treats if he’s been somewhat well-behaved.

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